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Why do so many ISO 9001 Implementation Programs Fail?
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Why do so many ISO 9001 Implementation Programs Fail?
Why do so many ISO 9001 Implementation Programs Fail?
Why do so many ISO 9001 Implementation Programs Fail?
Why do so many ISO 9001 Implementation Programs Fail?
Why do so many ISO 9001 Implementation Programs Fail?
Why do so many ISO 9001 Implementation Programs Fail?
Why do so many ISO 9001 Implementation Programs Fail?
Why do so many ISO 9001 Implementation Programs Fail?
Why do so many ISO 9001 Implementation Programs Fail?
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implementing a qms, implementing iso 9001, iso 9001 - quality management systems, implementation of a standard in a company
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  Post Number #17  
Old 27th May 2011, 04:10 PM
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Re: Why do many ISO 9001 implementation programs fail?

Quote:
In Reply to Parent Post by ScottK View Post

Yes, you can do all this with or without a standard or even showing the standard to most people... but people want a flag to follow. I think standards and regulations help provide that flag to the leader of the effort - whether it's implementing or continuing improvement.
I agree that standards and regulations can be a directional motivator, similar to the motivating aspects of understanding how your personal piece of the puzzle relates to the customer. However, in the context of "managing for quality", wouldn’t (or even shouldn't) a company’s Quality Policy would be the more appropriate “flag to follow”?

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  Post Number #18  
Old 28th May 2011, 01:02 AM
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Re: Why do many ISO 9001 implementation programs fail?

Quote:
In Reply to Parent Post by Sidney Vianna View Post

... failure is the lack of organizational (including top management) buy-in into the quality system. Failure is the continual disconnect between business processes and the "ISO program". Failure is the cultural stupidity of believing that a single department (QA/QC) can be held accountable alone to customer satisfaction and product conformity to requirements. That's what I consider failure in the context of this thread.
Good reasoning and good explanation of what failure is.
I couldn't agree more. If such an approach doesn't fail in the short term, it will in the medium.
  Post Number #19  
Old 28th May 2011, 02:49 AM
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Re: Why do many ISO 9001 implementation programs fail?

I agree with Sidney and Jane regarding failure, but that is from our perspective as quality professionals who want to see the things Sidney rightly defines well.

But in the eyes of the Managing Director implementing this system, s/he may have a different view. Maybe they would love to achieve these things but their focus is often elsewhere e.g. profitability, sales, 'short-termism', immediate survival.

We realise that a well grounded QMS can and should lead to these other factors but it is a brave step for someone to take to trust that 'doing it the right way' is the way to go.

Please don't misunderstand me, I am firmly of the same view but we seem to have this juggernaut of 'get the certificate' rolling relentlessly forward and fewer companies doing it for the 'right reasons'. My hope is that more and more companies will realise the benefits later down the line like the one I related a few months ago.
  Post Number #20  
Old 28th May 2011, 12:29 PM
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Re: Why do many ISO 9001 implementation programs fail?

Great post, Sidney!

Quote:
In Reply to Parent Post by Sidney Vianna View Post

Many people believe that ISO 9001 should be categorized as a business management system standard, rather than a quality management system document. The word quality, in their opinion, confuses the users of the document and make it for a harder engagement with top management of the organization. ... So, let me be as clear as I can, from the outset: I still believe that ISO 9001 [is] appropriately classified as Quality Management System Standards.

The proliferation of other discipline-specific standards...just prove the point that there is much more for a business to manage, other than quality.
Here are couple of reasons that many people share the belief that you mention in your first sentence: (1) For many businesses ISO 9001 is the first exposure to a management system. (2) Many of the challenges, practices and benefits of managing for quality apply to managing other disciplines of the business. ISO 9001 implementation lays the foundation for systems in other disciplines.

On the other hand, many definitions of Quality encompass much more than the traditional, limited, discipline-oriented definition of Quality, such as Q Assurance or Q Control. Quality is an attribute that all products and processes in an enterprise should have. A product lacking quality will fail. A key process lacking quality will cause a business to fail. It is in this broad definition of Quality that ISO 9001 becomes a Business Management System. Here Quality and Business are synonyms.

Further, once you have a functional management system, it is natural to extend it to other disciplines. Discipline barriers in the system are the kind of barriers that the process approach seeks to bring down, and for well-implemented systems, such barriers look entirely artificial. Quality can be defined to envelop other business management systems, such as E, H&S, etc., but not the other way around.

Because of the pervasive nature and effect of quality, ISO 9001 is a great introduction to management systems.

Quote:
In Reply to Parent Post by Sidney Vianna View Post

Irrespective of size, maturity, industry sector, ownership, etc., most organizations struggle with an effective implementation and maintenance of a quality management system. Most quality professionals report significant challenges in getting and maintaining top management connected to the QMS, interested, supportive and involved. Many organizations have a difficult time making a business case for maintaining ISO 9001 (or any other QMS standard) certification when economic hardship sets in. Most quality professionals resent the fact that other departments and functions don’t buy in and support ISO 9001 implementation. Why is that?

...the primary culprit is the misunderstanding of how ISO 9001 should be implemented. Going straight to the point, most quality programs fail because organizations don’t understand the difference of managing of quality and managing for quality. Managing for quality is the concept that the organization business processes are designed, maintained and improved to incorporate proper quality principles and practices. So, quality and customer satisfaction become the natural result of running the organization’s business processes. Managing for quality requires that each process owner will ensure their processes have the appropriate requirements for effective and efficient quality, environmental, occupational health & safety (to name a few disciplines) embedded in the process. For example, a New Product Introduction Process (which is a key process for many organizations) goes across several departments and functions and transcends the requirements of ISO 9001 section 7.3. But, instead of developing, maturing and improving the NPI process, what do many organizations do? They have a procedure to comply with 7.3 of ISO 9001. Instead of someone at the Engineering function being appointed as the NPI process owner, someone in the quality function will be responsible to baby-sit the organization for compliance against 7.3. There are tremendous implications in the different approaches. While the first approach promotes process ownership by the appropriate individuals, the second approach promotes the unsustainable path of someone from quality “policing” other departments (such as Engineering) to ensure they go through their necessary steps of planning, input, review, output, verification and validation. Such path is ineffective and can not be sustained over time.
Exactly. This brings to mind another recent discussion here about the necessity of involvement of the CEO in the QMS. In my mind, and bearing in mind the broader definition of Quality, the CEO should be a CQO. Without that, the main management system, the QMS, is bound to fail.


Quote:
In Reply to Parent Post by Colin View Post

I agree with Sidney and Jane regarding failure, but that is from our perspective as quality professionals who want to see the things Sidney rightly defines well.

But in the eyes of the Managing Director implementing this system, s/he may have a different view. Maybe they would love to achieve these things but their focus is often elsewhere e.g. profitability, sales, 'short-termism', immediate survival.

We realise that a well grounded QMS can and should lead to these other factors but it is a brave step for someone to take to trust that 'doing it the right way' is the way to go.
The QMS demands a large investment of time and money before it brings results. Many companies can't see through the whole investment and take short cuts. Sadly, this results in a lost investment. A couple of bad anecdotes will sway many a newbie business manager to think ISO is a bunch of paperwork with no benefits.
Thank You to Pancho for your informative Post and/or Attachment!
  Post Number #21  
Old 31st May 2011, 07:48 PM
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Re: Why do many ISO 9001 implementation programs fail?

Quote:
In Reply to Parent Post by Pancho View Post

For many businesses ISO 9001 is the first exposure to a management system.
Indeed, Pancho. Indeed. That's why, in my opinion, so many people confuse ISO 9001 with a Business Management System, rather than a QMS.

As you say, ISO 9001 implementation is, for many organizations, the trigger event to depart from the tribal knowledge approach to running a company to a process-defined and system approach for the organization.

Unfortunately organizations at that maturity level don't think business processes, they really don't understand the difference of managing an organization for quality and end up with procedures for "managing of quality". When ISO 9001 implementation and certification does not bring business benefits, they blame the standard and the auditors.

E la nave va....
Thanks to Sidney Vianna for your informative Post and/or Attachment!
  Post Number #22  
Old 31st May 2011, 07:57 PM
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Re: Why do many ISO 9001 implementation programs fail?

Quote:
In Reply to Parent Post by Sidney Vianna View Post

<snip>E la nave va....


And the ship sails?

Stijloor.
  Post Number #23  
Old 31st May 2011, 08:08 PM
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Re: Why do many ISO 9001 implementation programs fail?

“E la nave va”, says an Italian proverb, meaning that a big ship can keep sailing without anyone at the helm.
Thanks to Sidney Vianna for your informative Post and/or Attachment!
  Post Number #24  
Old 31st May 2011, 08:09 PM
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Re: Why do many ISO 9001 implementation programs fail?

Quote:
In Reply to Parent Post by Sidney Vianna View Post

“E la nave va”, says an Italian proverb, meaning that a big ship can keep sailing without anyone at the helm.

Like the story of "The Flying Dutchman?"

Stijloor.
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