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Engine Control System - Severity of an engine failure ('dies') in a truck or bus

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  Post Number #1  
Old 11th May 2006, 03:45 PM
SoftwareEng

 
 
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Question Engine Control System - Severity of an engine failure ('dies') in a truck or bus

"You are doing an FMEA on an engine control system for an on-highway truck/bus. You are considering a failure mode where the engine dies without any warning. What severity do you give this item, and why?"

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  Post Number #2  
Old 11th May 2006, 03:56 PM
Sidney Vianna's Avatar
Sidney Vianna

 
 
Total Posts: 9,318
How conservative you want to be?

Quote:
In Reply to Parent Post by SoftwareEng

"You are doing an FMEA on an engine control system for an on-highway truck/bus. You are considering a failure mode where the engine dies without any warning. What severity do you give this item, and why?"
You should provide the severity scale.
I would rate this as very severe. Highways are extremely dangerous. An unannounced engine failure could lead to diminished vehicle control (loss of power steering, power braking, etc....). The situation could lead to a collision ending up in casualties and severe injuries.
  Post Number #3  
Old 11th May 2006, 03:57 PM
Craig H.

 
 
Total Posts: 2,046
I would give it a very high rating. Why?

Often when the engine dies, so do control devices, like power steering and brake boosters. There have been fatalities where a truck engine quit, and the driver was not strong enough to turn the truck away from a most unfortunate victim. Pretty serious stuff.
  Post Number #4  
Old 11th May 2006, 03:58 PM
Craig H.

 
 
Total Posts: 2,046
I am glad to see that Sidney and I do agree, and for the same reasons.
  Post Number #5  
Old 11th May 2006, 04:03 PM
Crusader's Avatar
Crusader

 
 
Total Posts: 838
The severity (as I was told) depends upon who the next customer is. For my example: I was a Tier 2 supplier (at the time) of airbag filters. The Filter went into the Airbag Module (my Customer's product) that was sold to GM for production vehicles. My Customer told me that the severity rating of my Filter failing was not very high because I was not the Tier 1 supplier. My Customer's FMEA was the final "say" and that FMEA rated it as a very high rating. Like a good little soldier, I did what my Customer told me to do and left that potential failure at a medium failure (Middle of the scale).

Does that sound wrong to anyone?
  Post Number #6  
Old 11th May 2006, 04:06 PM
jmp4429

 
 
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Either way, I would rank it very high for the reasons stated above. Here, we rank engine failure with warning a 9 out of 10 for severity. If the failure could occur without warning, we rank it a 10.
  Post Number #7  
Old 11th May 2006, 04:20 PM
Crusader's Avatar
Crusader

 
 
Total Posts: 838
Quote:
In Reply to Parent Post by jmp4429

Either way, I would rank it very high for the reasons stated above. Here, we rank engine failure with warning a 9 out of 10 for severity. If the failure could occur without warning, we rank it a 10.
Yes - I agree. I had originally placed the rating at very high but when I submitted the FMEA, I was told (by my Customer) to change it.
  Post Number #8  
Old 11th May 2006, 07:48 PM
Helmut Jilling

 
 
Total Posts: 4,386
Quote:
In Reply to Parent Post by Lee

Yes - I agree. I had originally placed the rating at very high but when I submitted the FMEA, I was told (by my Customer) to change it.
another customer rep who hasn't read the FMEA book?
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