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Slide 89 of 262

Notes:

8.2 Monitoring and Measurement
8.2.1 Customer Satisfaction
Also see: 5.2

As one of the measurements of the performance of the quality management system, the company shall monitor information relating to customer perception as to whether the company has met customer requirements. The methods for obtaining and using this information shall be determined.
The ISO 9001:2000 standard now states that you must monitor information on customer satisfaction (and or dissatisfaction) as one of the measurements of performance of your quality system. You must also determine how you are going to obtain and use this information. This is a new requirement in the ISO 9001:2000 standard.

The 1994 version of the standard stated that the requirements that it entailed were specified primarily to achieve customer satisfaction. Now the standard is taking a different tone to that goal and specifically states that we must monitor customer satisfaction.

Do a lot of us currently do this now? Well, hopefully so, but it may not be likely. The primary method of monitoring customer satisfaction: "Hey John, did we get the order?" many companies can be falsely drawn into the conclusion that the customer is completely satisfied merely because they receive repeat business, but this may not be the case.

How many of you have continued shopping at a store which has poor service because it is convenient? Maybe it is close by to your work/home, maybe the store carries a product that you cannot find elsewhere, maybe they are cheap. Whatever the reason, you go back because of some reason other than you are happy with their service, and if given another option you would be more than willing to try it.

Though an exaggeration, this is an example of how repeat business may be false security.

Element 8.2.1 of the ISO 9001:2000 standard is in place to NOT allow this to happen. The standard requires that you define ways of obtaining and using information pertinent to your customer's satisfaction and monitoring this information as a minimum form of measuring quality management system performance. Being proactive and finding out issues before they arise is the idea, how you do it is up to you.

The new ISO 9001:2000 standard helps clarify whose opinion is most important in regards to your Quality System, Your Customer's. The new standard requires the "monitoring" of customer satisfaction information, it does not require the implementation of an entirely new measurement system. The extent that you want to take this is up to you.

8.2.1 Monitoring & Measuring - Customer Satisfaction.
Can I just use customer complaint to measure this? What kind of measurement the standard required? Please give some example?
No. The "no news is good news" adage as related to customer complaints is not enough to satisfy this particular requirement. Key questions you must be able to answer: Is information relating to customer perception monitored by the organization as to whether customer requirements have been met?
And second: Have the methodologies for obtaining and using information related to customer perception been determined?
Unless you have a business where customers come in and everyone leaves smiling giddily because they are so satisfied, you'll have to come up with other measurables.
examples: Customer complaints, direct communication with customers, questionnaires and surveys, reports from consumer organizations, reports in the media, sector studies, focus groups, market share info, etc...

Potential Audit Questions:

1. How does your company currently assess customer satisfaction? There must be some form or another in your company, whether it be based on repeat sales, customer surveys or by word of mouth, describe how this information gets into your company.

2. What is done with information regarding customer satisfaction once it is received? If it is dissatisfaction are corrective actions pursued? Who is the highest level of management to receive word about customer satisfaction? Who is responsible for communicating with customers?

3. How will your company satisfy the requirement for customer satisfaction in the ISO 9001:2000 standard? If it was a perfect world, how would you collect this information and use it?
-> "Measurement and monitoring Customer Satisfaction is
-> based on review of customer-related information. The
-> collection of such information may be active or passive."
-> There's probably a simple explanation of the difference
-> between the two methods. To me, passive means let the
-> information flow to you. Active would mean going after
-> it.

I think you're reading it right. If you send out a survey you're being active. If you rely on, or include, unsolicited letters from customers and such it's passive.

-> Passive looks too easy. Like, " I don't have that information because I never got it."

First – can you define what, in your company, you consider passive?

I would say most companies have some form of active aspect. I see both as important parts. If I went into a company and they said they had no passive customer feedback I would really begin to seriously wonder. No letters of appreciate? No letters from dissatisfied customers at all? Ever?

I had a client which was quite small – 12 employees. They explained they had not had a customer complaint for over 8 years. No letters. No phone calls. Nothing. But when we talked they better understood what a complaint is – to them – in their company. One aspect is that a sales rep visits every customer every month for at least a day to monitor the process and help in any way possible. The visits are, not that I agree, not documented (I think they’ll have to do that for the 2000 version ‘upgrade’). The problem for them initially was defining exactly what a customer complaint is. They restricted customer complaints (their definition) to a phone call, a FAX or other communication (of dissatisfaction or nonconformance) not originating in the customer facility with a rep. And by that definition they had not had a complaint in over 8 years. For a more complete understanding, the product is metal cleaning chemicals and phosphatizers. Not complex.

Another aspect of the problem is identifying measurables within either type (passive or active) of information gathered. Let's say you do a survey. First of all you won't get all of them back. next is the subjectivity of the questions you ask. This said, I think the most problematic aspect for you will be addressing issues of metrics. It says "Measuring and monitoring of..." and the measuring and associated aspects will be the 'hard' part.

8.2 Monitoring and Measurement
8.2.1 Customer Satisfaction

Also see: 5.2

As one of the measurements of the performance of the quality management system, the company shall monitor information relating to customer perception as to whether the company has met customer requirements. The methods for obtaining and using this information shall be determined.
The ISO 9001:2000 standard now states that you must monitor information on customer satisfaction (and or dissatisfaction) as one of the measurements of performance of your quality system. You must also determine how you are going to obtain and use this information. This is a new requirement in the ISO 9001:2000 standard.

The 1994 version of the standard stated that the requirements that it entailed were specified primarily to achieve customer satisfaction. Now the standard is taking a different tone to that goal and specifically states that we must monitor customer satisfaction.

Do a lot of us currently do this now? Well, hopefully so, but it may not be likely. The primary method of monitoring customer satisfaction: "Hey John, did we get the order?" many companies can be falsely drawn into the conclusion that the customer is completely satisfied merely because they receive repeat business, but this may not be the case.

How many of you have continued shopping at a store which has poor service because it is convenient? Maybe it is close by to your work/home, maybe the store carries a product that you cannot find elsewhere, maybe they are cheap. Whatever the reason, you go back because of some reason other than you are happy with their service, and if given another option you would be more than willing to try it.

Though an exaggeration, this is an example of how repeat business may be false security.

Element 8.2.1 of the ISO 9001:2000 standard is in place to NOT allow this to happen. The standard requires that you define ways of obtaining and using information pertinent to your customer's satisfaction and monitoring this information as a minimum form of measuring quality management system performance. Being proactive and finding out issues before they arise is the idea, how you do it is up to you.

The new ISO 9001:2000 standard helps clarify whose opinion is most important in regards to your Quality System, Your Customer's. The new standard requires the "monitoring" of customer satisfaction information, it does not require the implementation of an entirely new measurement system. The extent that you want to take this is up to you.

8.2.1 Monitoring & Measuring customer satisfaction.
Can I just use customer complaint to measure this? What kind of measurement the standard required? Please give some example?
No. the "no news is good news" adage as related to customer complaints is not enough to satisfy this particular requirement. Key questions you must be able to answer: Is information relating to customer perception monitored by the organization as to whether customer requirements have been met?
And second: Have the methodologies for obtaining and using information related to customer perception been determined?
Unless you have a business where customers come in and everyone leaves smiling giddily because they are so satisfied, you'll have to come up with other measurables.

Examples: Customer complaints, direct communication with customers, questionnaires and surveys, reports from consumer organizations, reports in the media, sector studies, focus groups, market share info, etc...

Potential Audit Questions

1. How does your company currently assess customer satisfaction? There must be some form or another in your company, whether it be based on repeat sales, customer surveys or by word of mouth, describe how this information gets into your company.

2. What is done with information regarding customer satisfaction once it is received? If it is dissatisfaction are corrective actions pursued? Who is the highest level of management to receive word about customer satisfaction? Who is responsible for communicating with customers?

3. How will your company satisfy the requirement for customer satisfaction in the ISO 9001:2000 standard? If it was a perfect world, how would you collect this information and use it?
-> "Measurement and monitoring Customer Satisfaction is
-> based on review of customer-related information. The
-> collection of such information may be active or passive."
-> There's probably a simple explanation of the difference
-> between the two methods. To me, passive means let the
-> information flow to you. Active would mean going after
-> it.

I think you're reading it right. If you send out a survey you're being active. If you rely on, or include, unsolicited letters from customers and such it's passive.

-> Passive looks too easy. Like, " I don't have that information because I never got it."

First – can you define what, in your company, you consider passive?

I would say most companies have some form of active aspect. I see both as important parts. If I went into a company and they said they had no passive customer feedback I would really begin to seriously wonder. No letters of appreciate? No letters from dissatisfied customers at all? Ever?

I had a client which was quite small – 12 employees. They explained they had not had a customer complaint for over 8 years. No letters. No phone calls. Nothing. But when we talked they better understood what a complaint is – to them – in their company. One aspect is that a sales rep visits every customer every month for at least a day to monitor the process and help in any way possible. The visits are, not that I agree, not documented (I think they’ll have to do that for the 2000 version ‘upgrade’). The problem for them initially was defining exactly what a customer complaint is. They restricted customer complaints (their definition) to a phone call, a FAX or other communication (of dissatisfaction or nonconformance) not originating in the customer facility with a rep. And by that definition they had not had a complaint in over 8 years. For a more complete understanding, the product is metal cleaning chemicals and phosphatizers. Not complex.

Another aspect of the problem is identifying measurables within either type (passive or active) of information gathered. Let's say you do a survey. First of all you won't get all of them back. next is the subjectivity of the questions you ask. This said, I think the most problematic aspect for you will be addressing issues of metrics. It says "Measuring and monitoring of..." and the measuring and associated aspects will be the 'hard' part.


   

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