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25 Year Retention period - Records of destroyed or discarded controlled documents

S

Skyking115

#1
In my company we will retain all job records for 25 years (we've only been in business for 17 so far). Now, my question is how can we keep track of when 25 years is up (on a master list)? and who is usually responsible for something like that? All suggestions are greatly appreciated. Skyking115
 
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J

Jim Biz

#2
Just 2 cents worth--

How many records/documents? How long do you legally need to keep/archive all or any part of them??

Possible to scan them into a computer database? - even if you needed to dedicate one or two hard drives for them?

Reagrds
Jim
 
S

Skyking

#3
How many depends on what is sold. We are responsible for maintaining them for 20 years. As to scanning them in, it's hard enough to get them to buy software more or less a scanner.
 
A

AJPaton

#4
In our industry, we have a legal responsibility to keep records for 15 years. Have tried to argue electronic copies as adequate records, but legal department refuses.
Before you go electronic you might want to check your legal footing too.
Our grudging solution-filing cabinets with orders in ~ chronological order. We lose a lot of floor space to them, but it does make it easier to trash paperwork when due. And retrieve for lawsuits.

AJP
 
W

Wallybaloo

#5
Got a question for Sky before I know whether or not to stick my nose in this. Why 25 or 20 year retention? Is this a "Life of the Product" (ISO 13485/EN 46001 medical device) issue? A production plus 5 year (Medical Device Directive) issue?

This seems like a long retention time and I'm wondering if you can't begin by making a change there.
 
S

Skyking

#6
We build firetrucks and the NFPA requires that you are responsible to keep records for 20 years.
 
J

Jim Biz

#7
What works for us ... with the ones we don't scan is to keep the current - 5 yrs available in office file cabinets - then we take what hard copies we need to keep - longer (some 7-10 years)index & "archive store" them by date in back room storage boxes. It took a while to convince our upper level folks to invest in a scanner too but we found the 150-200 well worth the reduction in storage space.

Regards
Jim
 

Marc

Captain Nice
Staff member
Admin
#8
Anyone with current thoughts on recording what controlled documents are destroyed or disgarded?
 
#9
Marc said:
Anyone with current thoughts on recording what controlled documents are destroyed or disgarded?
In my opinion, "destroyed" is destroyed.

What's the sense of discarding a document if you are going to create another document to record you destroyed it?

If you have a policy that dictates WHEN a document will be destroyed, that is sufficient notice for parties.

The attachment is a copy of the American Bar Association's sample document retention policy. Obviously it :ca: . You will note some documents are suggested to be kept forever.

I was particularly struck by this item:
Press Releases/Public Filings​
The Company should retain permanent copies of all press releases and publicly filed documents under the theory that the Company should have its own copy to test the accuracy of any document a member of the public can theoretically produce against that Company.​
 

Attachments

Helmut Jilling

Auditor / Consultant
#10
Wes Bucey said:
In my opinion, "destroyed" is destroyed.

What's the sense of discarding a document if you are going to create another document to record you destroyed it?

If you have a policy that dictates WHEN a document will be destroyed, that is sufficient notice for parties.

The attachment is a copy of the American Bar Association's sample document retention policy. Obviously it :ca: . You will note some documents are suggested to be kept forever.

I was particularly struck by this item:


I agree that there shouldn't be a need to record what is destroyed. When it is gone, it is unavailable. There is no need to list that it is unavailable.

However, personally, I don't have any problem with attorneys recommending certain records be kept permanently. Most if not all of my clients have some records which will be permanent. The US Gov. has mountains of records from ages ago. Each company can decide for themselves.

There is much to criticize attorneys for, but I wouldn't begin with record keeping practices.
 
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