4.9 Control of Nonconforming Testing - Work

Douglas E. Purdy

Quite Involved in Discussions
This question is primarily for those accredited Testing Labs. To begin with, How would you complete that title? Control of Nonconforming Testing Work - Testing Activity - or just Testing? If you are a testing lab that performs destructive type testing, then what is to the control of the Test Item after the test? If the Test Item Fails to comply OR complies with Requirements (result of testing) does the Test Item itself have to be identified since it was made unuseable? Would you share with me how you addressed this element in your testing laboratory?

Thanks,
Doug
 

Marc

Fully vaccinated are you?
Leader
How 'bout 'Control of Nonconforming Tests'? I assume you are referring to a test performed incorrectly as opposed to test failures. If an item 'fails' a test but the test was performed correctly, there is no nonconformance on the part of the testing lab. Any failure of the test item is an issue for the customer to deal with.

Items should be well identified but how far you go, especially with respect to evidence (pictures, data, etc.), depends upon the overall requirements. The item its self is 'evidence' and it is the customer's property. Typically a lab will ask ahead of time if the customer wants the remnants of the test. Typically they do, especially if the DUT (device under test) fails so they can analyze the failure mode(s). Just like any contract review process, all the customer requirements should be determined well in advance of the actual testing.

I once managed Cincinnati Electronics' environmental test lab - vibration, shock, Mil-S-901 Shock, humidity, altitude, explosive atmosphere, salt spray, thermal shock - you name it we did it. Mostly Mil testing (such as various Mil-Std-810 testing) but we took outside commercial work. As an 'Oh My' fact, I first started in automotive there, strange as it seems today, doing studies for Ford in environmental stress screening of a number of their electronic assemblies.

We also did the studies for qualification of the original Ryan Storm-Scope for aircraft. We took pictures of both the display and the DUT periodically throughout the testing process, took notes, we took electical readings. We ended up with a pile of documentation which we submitted with a long 'report' explaining exactly what we did, how we did it, when we did it, etc. The report was to be part of their submission to the FAA for 'qualification'.

The requirements were all determined prior to my replying to a RFQ. It was in that job that I first understood the importance of contract review.
 
E

energy

I'm not so sure.....

Marc said:
How 'bout 'Control of Nonconforming Tests'? I assume you are referring to a test performed incorrectly as opposed to test failures. If an item 'fails' a test but the test was performed correctly, there is no nonconformance on the part of the testing lab. Any failure of the test item is an issue for the customer to deal with.

Although Doug has said it is much clearer, now, I'm fuzzy on the assumption that he is asking about tests performed incorrectly. It appears to this "It's Monday and Foggy Head) that Doug is asking about the control of items that have either passed or failed the properly performed destructive test. No? :bonk:
 

Douglas E. Purdy

Quite Involved in Discussions
Was Foggy!

Energy,

At the time of the post I was foggy. After re-thinking the 4.9 requirements and the requirement in 4.1.5 a) departures and actions to prevent or minimize such departures, I came up with a process to cover both. You are perceptive, and thanks for trying to help me!

Doug
 
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