9/11 - 2 years later -- feels like yesterday

J

JRKH

Gosh - Where I was.......

I'm only 48 but lets see

JFK .... 3rd grade catholic school .... Pastor came around to the classes then everone went over to church

Might as well count all of '68
Tet Offensive
Bobby
MLK
Chicago Democratic Convention
Apollo orbits the Moon

'69
Man on the moon... with my family...at my uncle's. I remember walking outside that July night and looking up at the moon and thinking how we were looking at Neal and Buzz at that moment. And that we were looking at another inhabited world.

Watergate ... Glued to the tely while tricky dick resigned.

Challenger ... At work

Pricess Di ... Picked up the Morning paper

Coumbia ... at my store

9/11 ... At work

Feels like I've seen to much. Starting to see how my parents feel.

James
 
J

Jimmy Olson

Well, since I'm a youngster I can only go back to Challenger as the first real disaster I remember. I was in school and my classroom was watching it.

I had a lot of the same feelings 2 years ago that have already been expressed here and share the same feeling of Randy when I picked up my son (just over 1 year at the time). I sat on the couch with him just thinking what life is going to be like for him. I also remember how things were different in the following days, but instead of remembering how quiet the skys were, I remember how everything looked. I remember seing the signs of support and togetherness, and seeing flags everywhere. There were flags on buildings, freeway overpasses, on vehicles, everywhere you looked. Too bad that didn't last.
 
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L

Laura M

My turn

Don't remember JFK or Bobby - but

Man on Moon - Living Room - I was little
Challanger - Going to bank at lunch - told teller - who told rest of bank
Columbia - came home from soccer tourney to find hubby glued to TV
Diana - Came out of Comedy Club in Cleveland and heard she was injured - got to hotel to hear the dreadful outcome.
Towers - at a client, planning an audit - and someone walked by that made a stereotyped remark about being attacked and who probably did it. I went and watched until the 2nd tower fell. When I heard about the pentagon and PA plane, I was sure more was coming. I went home and sat with a neighbor - expecting school to be cancelled. By far the biggest.

Other memorables: getting the phone call about a cousin killed in nam - I was little, but this was an impact - so then the fall of Saigon on TV. Years later I met one of the vietnamese 'babies' that was passed to a soldier - the niece of an embassy workers who has never seen her parents again. WOW - the big world/small world thing.

Others - Nixon resigning and Elvis dying - both on vacation in Florida, and both near my birthday.

You're right - starting to sound like my parents......
 

RoxaneB

Change Agent and Data Storyteller
Super Moderator
Thought I'd throw my two cents in...

I was at our Executive Offices last week on a training course with Americans, Brazilians, and a few fellow Canadians.

On the 10th we were told what the agenda would be for ceremonies on the 11th.

- Patriotic Day > So please wear red, white, or blue if you have it.
- A moment of silence
- Pledge of Allegiance to be recited by all.

I had a problem with the last one. I am sorry for what happened. I am sorry that the effects will be felt by many people for years to come if not for the rest of their lives. But, being Canadian, I felt rather upset at being told that I was required to recite the Pledge of Allegiance. The Brazilians appeared uncomfortable, too. Thankfully, that last one was quickly made optional. And, come the 11th, for whatever reason, there was no recitation at all.

However...things that stand out in my mind...

  • Challenger - Had permission to be "sick" that day from grade school and watched it live.
  • Berlin Wall - In my car with my exchange partner from Germany, who was singing the German national anthem at the top of her lungs.
  • Persian Gulf - Giving tours of the high school to some kids and their families. Ran into the bathroom and cried.
  • Canadian Referendum - Sitting with my friends in a campus pub, watching as two of them who were engaged to each, break apart as he was "oui" and she was "non" and then wearing a toga the next day into a first year drafting class to make all 500 frosh stand up and sing the national anthem in both english and french.
  • Princess Diana - Coming home from a late night of dances and parties and general socializing.
  • Columbia - Gym
  • Twin Towers - Work and then all of us realized that we had a coworker in the air over the US, mass panic set in until we realized that Steve was safe.

It seems rather amazing (and rather sad, too) that those moments that stick out in our minds are negative events. Except for the Berlin Wall, each of the events that I clearly recall were tense, stressful moments (okay, the toga results of the Referendum wasn't).
 
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E

energy

I won't

CarolX said:
I see what you mean......

I'll let it go....chalk it up to small thinking....if ya know what I mean.:agree:

CX

They haven't been back since. That suits me fine. However, should he/she return............ :p
 
D

db

I was teaching an internal auditor class on the 11th and 12th. we debated whether we should stop the class, and reschedule it for later. The students decided not to.

I remember being activated for a conference in Phoenix, AZ during Operation Desert Shield. I left the meeting knowing that military action was imminent (Gulf War I). On the flight back to Detroit, I prayed almost the entire way. When I stepped off the plane to what appeared to be a deserted concourse. I mean there was no one around. Then I saw a bunch of folks huddled around the bar. I cannot describe the utter sense of despair I felt. I said to myself that “they finally did it. The war has started.”

In a way, that was worse than 9/11. The reason might be that I was expecting GWI, but hoping (and praying) that it could have been avoided. 9/11 was a total surprise and there was a lot of shock involved.
 
E

energy

I forgot that one!

db said:
I remember being activated for a conference in Phoenix, AZ during Operation Desert Shield. I left the meeting knowing that military action was imminent (Gulf War I). On the flight back to Detroit, I prayed almost the entire way. When I stepped off the plane to what appeared to be a deserted concourse. I mean there was no one around. Then I saw a bunch of folks huddled around the bar. I cannot describe the utter sense of despair I felt. I said to myself that “they finally did it. The war has started.”

I remember it was a Wednesday night and I was bowling. Everybody stopped bowling and gathered around the TV. It was interesting...the older guys were pretty much quiet, but the younger ones were hooting and hollering and cheering. It was obvious that none of them were going. My thoughts? The same as when we whacked Kadafi. It's about time we stopped talking.
:smokin:
 
R

Randy Stewart

On the 10th we were told what the agenda would be for ceremonies on the 11th.

- Patriotic Day > So please wear red, white, or blue if you have it.
- A moment of silence
- Pledge of Allegiance to be recited by all.

Is your executive offices in Canada?
Unless you are a US citizen you shouldn't be pushed to wear red, white and blue. And if your not a US citizen why recite the Pledge of Allegiance to anothers flag? Makes no sense to me.
Webster says that a patriot is "one that loves and serves his or hers country". If this isn't your country it shouldn't be forced on anyone.
Then I saw a bunch of folks huddled around the bar. I cannot describe the utter sense of despair I felt. I said to myself that “they finally did it. The war has started.”

I returned home from the first stop in GWI on 12 - 26, was sent to Georgia on 12 - 28 and was deployed back to the Gulf on 1 - 4. I remember sitting in Hooters at Jacks Landing in Jacksonville hearing people talk about the war, E-7's crying on TV because they "only came in for the benefits", etc. I was thinking, I've already been there you idiots. Shut your pie holes, quit complaining, get out or just quit acting like you support us. We'll get the job done and you can keep sitting here having a good time while we keep you safe! I was sooo pissed.
 
D

db

Randy Stewart said:
Then I saw a bunch of folks huddled around the bar. I cannot describe the utter sense of despair I felt. I said to myself that “they finally did it. The war has started.”

I returned home from the first stop in GWI on 12 - 26, was sent to Georgia on 12 - 28 and was deployed back to the Gulf on 1 - 4. I remember sitting in Hooters at Jacks Landing in Jacksonville hearing people talk about the war, E-7's crying on TV because they "only came in for the benefits", etc. I was thinking, I've already been there you idiots. Shut your pie holes, quit complaining, get out or just quit acting like you support us. We'll get the job done and you can keep sitting here having a good time while we keep you safe! I was sooo pissed.

My sense of despair was not in that I would soon be activated for the war, it was because I had seen the casulty estimates. I knew that once the first round was fired, it is hard to take it back. I knew that there would be an awful lot of body bags coming home (I really thank God the reports were wrong).

I was ready to go. But the thoughts of June 6th 1944 kept running through my mind. I'm glad "Saving Private Ryan" hadn't come along yet.
 
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Laura M

RCBeyette said:
Thought I'd throw my two cents in...

I was at our Executive Offices last week on a training course with Americans, Brazilians, and a few fellow Canadians.

On the 10th we were told what the agenda would be for ceremonies on the 11th.

- Patriotic Day > So please wear red, white, or blue if you have it.
- A moment of silence
- Pledge of Allegiance to be recited by all.

.

I'm assuming your corp office was in the US? I don't mind your not feeling comfortalbe "pledging" our country. It's meant for us. I do mind when US inhabitants (citizens or not) mind it. I hate that some schools think "under God" isn't needed, and that kids don't have to say it under "freedom of speech."

On the other hand - being in Roch, NY we play alot of Canadian Teams - especially hockey. I love your anthem and I think alot of Americans pretend they know the words. I guess an anthem is different than a pledge. Do you have a pledge?
 
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