A TAKT time calculator

W

wmarhel

Hi Chris,

Nice job on the attached file, but I'm going to play devil's advocate here. I am not going to say what is right or wrong, but just throw out an opinion for others to chew on.

I'm curious about your introduction of OEE into the takt calculation. I can understand your thinking, but I'm not sure if it is appropriate since I think it could also force some unwanted behavior.

Technically speaking, if you have an eight hour shift with two fifteen minute breaks then it leaves 450 minutes of production time. If my daily requirement is 450 units, then I need to produce one unit every minute. I'm not really sure how the addition of OEE into the equation really improves it. I would also argue that performing OEE on every piece of equipment that might be in an assembly line or process is a waste in itself.

As for unwanted behavior:

1) The use of OEE can be actually tie up resources doing non-value added data collection and entry. After all, I just need to take a walk to see if material is building up in front of a machine or an operation downstream is being starved of materials.

or

2) How about the possibility of creating an assumption in the workers that, "Since I'm meeting takt, there are no problems."

Thanks for the contribution. As I said, I'm just playing devil's advocate since it ultimately comes down to each company embracing what works best for them.

Wayne
 
C

Chris Ely

Wayne,
Thanks for the response. I agree, using OEE is a questionable practice. I use it to "pad" the numbers a little when I am working with a completely new process. If I am forecasting for a new product line/process I give my self a lower OEE % so that I am working towards a goal that is better than necessary to meet customer demand.
When calculating takt for most processes, I leave OEE at 100%. I sometimes go greater than 100% to establish goals.
Again, thanks for the feedback....hope to have more.
Chris
 
A

AggieRob02

Hello. I am new to the Forum and would appreciate some help. I have established timestudies for Work Content/Total Cycle Time for each workstation. The question is that each Station is above the Establish Takt time. Would the number of Stations required be Cycle Time/Takt Time? Also how would you determine the required crew size at each station?

Thanks for the Help,
AggieRob02
 
W

wmarhel

Hello. I am new to the Forum and would appreciate some help. I have established timestudies for Work Content/Total Cycle Time for each workstation. The question is that each Station is above the Establish Takt time. Would the number of Stations required be Cycle Time/Takt Time? Also how would you determine the required crew size at each station?

Thanks for the Help,
AggieRob02

For a purely manual operation, then yes, the ability to meet takt is: Cycle Time / Takt ?

For semi-automated processes, some stations might be bottleneck operations and will require the use of buffer inventory be kept between the bottleneck and the next operation. If you google DFT or Demand Flow Technology, you should be able to find some materials on this approach which is relatively straightforward.

I've posted a presentation on DFT here for an overview.

Wayne.
 

Attachments

  • Demand Flow Technology Training.ppt
    1.7 MB · Views: 1,471
A

AggieRob02

The PFT Powerpoint was great, thanks! However, The Calculation for Manpower variable "L" is unknown. The Total Equation is:

Dr= (Dc x L)/(H x S)

Would you be able to help? I also estimate that Dc represents the Takt Time. Would you please be able to help? Thanks again,

AggieRob02
 
W

wmarhel

The PFT Powerpoint was great, thanks! However, The Calculation for Manpower variable "L" is unknown. The Total Equation is:

Dr= (Dc x L)/(H x S)

Would you be able to help? I also estimate that Dc represents the Takt Time. Would you please be able to help? Thanks again,

AggieRob02

Dc = Designed Daily Rate at Capacity (The highest targeted daily volume output of products that is planned to be achieved by a Demand Flow manufacturing process.)

L = Labor Content (Time to produce one unit)

H = Hours per Shift

S = # of Shifts

Just make sure you keep the units of time consistent. Don't use five minutes for labor content and eight for hours as an example.

Wayne
 
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