Accreditation, Registration and Certification - What are the differences?

Sidney Vianna

Post Responsibly
Staff member
Admin
#2
amanbhai said:
what's the difference between accreditation & certification? Positively.
Thanks
http://www.iso.org/iso/en/iso9000-14000/understand/basics/general/basics_5.html
Certification, registration and accreditation

Both the ISO 9000 and ISO 14000 families contain a single "certification" standard. "Certification", "registration" and "accreditation" are three words that will certainly crop up on your ISO 9000 or ISO 14000 journey. Just what exactly do they mean? Let's first take the first two.

According to the standardized definitions*, they are not quite the same thing. In the context of ISO 9001:2000 or ISO 14001:2004, "certification" refers to the issuing of written assurance (the certificate) by an independent, external body that has audited an organization's management system and verified that it conforms to the requirements specified in the standard.

"Registration" means that the auditing body then records the certification in its client register.

The organization's management system has therefore been both certified and registered. For practical purposes, in the ISO 9001:2000 and ISO 14001:2004 contexts, the difference between the two terms is not significant and both are acceptable for general use.

"Certification" seems to be the term most widely used worldwide, although registration (from which "registrar" as an alternative to registration/certification body) is often preferred in North America, and the two are also used interchangeably.

On the contrary, using "accreditation" as an interchangeable alternative for certification or registration is a mistake, because it means something different. In the ISO 9001:2000 or ISO 14001:2004 context, accreditation refers to the formal recognition by a specialized body - an accreditation body - that a certification body is competent to carry out ISO 9001:2000 or ISO 14001:2004 certification in specified business sectors. In simple terms, accreditation is like certification of the certification body. Certificates issued by accredited certification bodies - and known as "accredited certificates" - may be perceived on the market as having increased credibility.

Therefore, it is okay to state that your organization has been "certified" or "registered" (if, indeed, it has!), but inaccurate to state that it has been "accredited" (unless your organization is a certification/registration body).
 
C

corollax

#4
Why don't somebody create a new word call "accredification".

I can also tell my customers : "Good morning, our company is accredificated to ISO58028..." where 58028 = 9001+14001+18001+17025. The higher the ISO number, the more impress will be our customers! :biglaugh:
 

Hershal

Metrologist-Auditor
Staff member
Super Moderator
#5
corollax said:
Why don't somebody create a new word call "accredification".

I can also tell my customers : "Good morning, our company is accredificated to ISO58028..." where 58028 = 9001+14001+18001+17025. The higher the ISO number, the more impress will be our customers! :biglaugh:
Careful what you suggest.....someone with a bunch of smoke and morriors will jump on-line and offer an all-on-line package.....

Accreditation is administered by accrediting bodies. Accreditation is for organizations such as laboratories, inspection bodies, and ISO 9K registrars.

Registration is administered by organizations such as 9K registrars.

Certification is basically for either personnel or equipment.

Hope this helps.

Hershal
 

Marc

Retired Old Goat
Staff member
Admin
#6
I can't begin to tell you how many people will insist their company is ISO 9001 Certified. Unfortunately, many, many people do not understand the distinctions between Accreditation, Registration and Certification.
 
#7
Marc said:
I can't begin to tell you how many people will insist their company is ISO 9001 Certified. Unfortunately, many, many people do not understand the distinctions between Accreditation, Registration and Certification.
It's a distinction (registration/certification) without a significant difference. From the reference Sidney posted:

The organization's management system has therefore been both certified and registered. For practical purposes, in the ISO 9001:2000 and ISO 14001:2004 contexts, the difference between the two terms is not significant and both are acceptable for general use.

"Certification" seems to be the term most widely used worldwide, although registration (from which "registrar" as an alternative to registration/certification body) is often preferred in North America, and the two are also used interchangeably.
No company that I know of ever got "certified" without also getting "registered."
 

Rockanna

Inactive Registered Visitor
#8
Certified without Registration

We just recently heard that companies are wanting registars to audit their quality management system but not pay for the certification/registration.

Basically, they want someone to say they are an ISO company without paying for the certification/registration.

Has anyone heard of this happening in your area? :confused:
 

Coury Ferguson

Moderator here to help
Staff member
Super Moderator
#9
Marc said:
I can't begin to tell you how many people will insist their company is ISO 9001 Certified. Unfortunately, many, many people do not understand the distinctions between Accreditation, Registration and Certification.

Marc,

You are right on. A company has a "Registered" System, not a "Certified" System.


Coury Ferguson
 

RoxaneB

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
#10
corollax said:
"Good morning, our company is accredificated to ISO58028..." where 58028 = 9001+14001+18001+17025. The higher the ISO number, the more impress will be our customers! :biglaugh:
Amusingly enough, Dilbert has reached a similiar theory....
 

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