Air Pressure Gage Calibration

hippiegurl67

Registered
We supply a tire/wheel combo to the OEM. We attach an air pressure gage to the tire/wheel to measure the pressure and then add or remove air based on the requirement. There is a lot of internal discussion on if these pressure gages should be calibrated. Can someone provide that answer? Thank you!
 

Miner

Forum Moderator
Leader
Admin
If the pressure is a customer requirement, then the pressure gages should be calibrated/verified.
 

hippiegurl67

Registered
I agree but having arguments within our corporation. Thank you! Can you reference anything in the MSA manual that would be good "evidence" for our argument? Thank you!
 

Miner

Forum Moderator
Leader
Admin
It would not be in the MSA manual, but in the requirements of ISO 9001 and IATF 16949:

Section 7.1.5.2.1 Calibration/verification records

The organization shall have a documented process for managing calibration/verification records. Records of the calibration. verification activity for all gauges and measuring and test equipment (including employee-owned equipment relevant for measuring, customer-owned equipment, or on-site supplier-owned equipment needed to provide evidence of conformity to internal requirements, legislative and regulatory requirements, and customer-defined requirements shall be retained.
 

BradM

Leader
Admin
Question... you construct this wheel combination and ship it. You put air in it. Let's say the tire is rated for... 50psi maximum.

If you think you're putting 50 in it but you're actually putting in 57 psi, you could potentially cause damage to the tire. Right? That could be a potential lawsuit. Right?

If you're suppose to put 50 and put... 20, any harm in that?

What are you contracted to do? Is there any contractual requirement with respect to air pressure?

I'm asking all of this because sometimes you do things because it's the right thing to do; not necessarily because one is told to do it. :)

You could set up a quick manifold, put 6-8 of these gauges on there. Have one master gauge that is calibrated. If the gauges on the manifold are within some tolerance, they're fine. You keep it simple and low cost; and you can now have assurance those gauges were checked.
 

dwperron

Trusted Information Resource
I'm asking all of this because sometimes you do things because it's the right thing to do; not necessarily because one is told to do it. :)


Absolutely agree. In a case like this, when in doubt calibrate. You can't go wrong that way.
 

Ed Panek

QA RA Small Med Dev Company
Leader
Super Moderator
The customer returns a huge order for being improperly inflated costing you lots of $$. What do you do?
 
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