Ambiguous Customers

Farley.0

Starting to get Involved
Hello,

I represent the QMS for an IATF 16949:2016 registered/certified sub-tier supplier. We provide a service to automotive and non-automotive customers. In our quality manual, we state that all IATF requirements apply to the former and not the latter. The issue we are confronted with is customers that can be somewhat ambiguous with what industries they are supplying and whether we need to provide them with automotive supply-chain focus. These customers do not have customer specific requirements or supplier manuals to speak of. The biggest "tell" that led us to believe one customer supplied to automotive was their request for a CQI Special Process Assessment; that company was our customer's customer.

Has anyone else experienced scenarios similar to this? If so, how do you approach customers that are not explicitly automotive. Thank you in advance for any feedback you may provide.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Doesn't matter if it's in your customer agreement to do so, if not, then alter the agreement and charge for the extra.
 

malasuerte

Quite Involved in Discussions
Note: It is "customer requirements" not "customer specific requirements".

As per above by Randy - If they are requesting a CQI, then you either charge, refuse or if you choose, provide out of the kindness of your heart.

In general, the way it should be handled is that you provide "offerings" - COTS (commercial off the Shelf) or Automotive. You need to make it clear to this customer that they get your COTS offering which entails XYZ, anything additional is $$.
 
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Jim Wynne

Leader
Admin
In general, the way it should be handled is that you provide "offerings" - COTS (Customer off the Shelf) or Automotive. You need to make it clear to this customer that they get your COTS offering which entails XYZ, anything additional is $$.
It's commercial off-the-shelf, (essentially catalog items) and the OP hasn't indicated that his company is dealing with that sort of product.
 

malasuerte

Quite Involved in Discussions
It's commercial off-the-shelf, (essentially catalog items) and the OP hasn't indicated that his company is dealing with that sort of product.
Correct - updated. Had the word customer on the mind.

OP did mention Auto and Non-Auto
 

Ron Rompen

Trusted Information Resource
In my opinion (based on the way things were 30+ years ago) you are looking at this in the wrong way. Basically, you are trying to have two different QMS for different customers - one for automotive, one for non-automotive.
IMHO, it is MUCH easier in the long run to have only ONE system, and apply it to ALL customers. Yes, it may cost a little bit more, but if you don't, then it is a foregone conclusion that someone will be using the wrong system on the day of the audit.
One of the reasons that 9001 and 16949 were created was to have a COMMON quality management system, rather than the old way of each customer having their own.
I remember those days......and I definitely would NOT want to go back to them.
 
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