Approved Supplier List (ASL): Document or Record?

GStough

Staff member
Super Moderator
#1
Ok, I know it's just because I have been reading the audit papers for the internal audit of purchasing, and have been so focused on one thing that I have probably overlooked a very simple answer. But, I'm going to ask, anyway. :eek:

Although an ASL is not required, we do have one and it is identified in a matrix of records in the quality records procedure as a record. However, there seems to be a mutual understanding among several people here that it is actually a controlled document.

My question: is there any definitive answer to the question posed in this thread's title? If so, where might it be found - in a standard or regulation somewhere, perhaps? :bonk:

Thanks, y'all....:bigwave:
 
W

world quality

#2
Remember, There is a requirement for a SQM and this goes along with the SQM, and it is a record if it is put into a excel file to maintain the Supplier Processes and evaluation. If its listed as a document, yes.

If it is list as a self aliance Index then no.

The bottom answer is and also comes from the requirements of your customer.
 

GStough

Staff member
Super Moderator
#3
Remember, There is a requirement for a SQM and this goes along with the SQM, and it is a record if it is put into a excel file to maintain the Supplier Processes and evaluation. If its listed as a document, yes.

If it is list as a self aliance Index then no.

The bottom answer is and also comes from the requirements of your customer.
Our ASL is just a list of approved suppliers, nothing else. No evaluation information, "supplier since" dates, nothing....just the suppliers listed in alphabetical order, the revision number of the list, and revision date. And I do believe it is maintained as an Excel file.

Thanks for your reply, world quality. :agree:
 

qusys

Quite Involved in Discussions
#5
The Approved Supplier List is not a mandatory document because there is no requirement in ISO 9001 or ISO TS 16949 to have it.
Said that, if the organization established this as an internal requirement , put inside a purchasing procedure, this could be seen as a controlled document , subjected to approval loop and notification in case of changes.
We can see it as an enclosed document or appendix to the above procedure.
:bigwave:
 
Last edited by a moderator:
#6
Ok, I know it's just because I have been reading the audit papers for the internal audit of purchasing, and have been so focused on one thing that I have probably overlooked a very simple answer. But, I'm going to ask, anyway. :eek:

Although an ASL is not required, we do have one and it is identified in a matrix of records in the quality records procedure as a record. However, there seems to be a mutual understanding among several people here that it is actually a controlled document.

My question: is there any definitive answer to the question posed in this thread's title? If so, where might it be found - in a standard or regulation somewhere, perhaps? :bonk:

Thanks, y'all....:bigwave:
It could be both. The template, or blank form that the list is on, would be a document. When your approved suppliers are added to it, it becomes a record.
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#7
It could be both. The template, or blank form that the list is on, would be a document. When your approved suppliers are added to it, it becomes a record.
If you have two different versions (of what you're calling a record) how do you tell which is current?
 

Marc

Captain Nice
Staff member
Admin
#8
It could be both. The template, or blank form that the list is on, would be a document. When your approved suppliers are added to it, it becomes a record.
That has been my take on it. You have a form that is (or should be) controlled. When you update it, as in the case of an Approved Supplier List, the previous version becomes a record.

Many years ago I developed a simple document and records list for small companies. One of these I have had posted here for a long time. One of the things I ran into during implementations was getting them to understand the differences between documents and records.

Simple Document and Record Control Matrix.pdf

Even today I think it is a good way to relate relationships to people to help them understand differences between documents, forms and records, especially how a Form becomes a Record. :2cents:
 

AndyN

A problem shared...
Trusted
#10
I think some of you are seriously over thinking this for poor Gidget!

It's a document, plain and simple! If a supplier is added to it and the document is revised, then the previous one - without the 'new' supplier is an 'obsolete' document - for retention if required. No record about it!

This is basic blocking and tackling.......
 

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