Are GRE words useful in American daily life?

T

tongxiaozhi

#1
I feel that my vocabulary is not enough, want to enlarge it, I'm wondering if GRE words are useful? any answers are highly apprecieated.

Thanks
 
Elsmar Forum Sponsor

Marc

Fully vaccinated are you?
Leader
#4
It also stands for other things. I'm trying to get the original poster to clarify rather than my just guessing. The GRE test does have a vocabulary part, but I don't know how that fits in with the question of whether "GRE words" are useful or not. For example, what are some example "GRE words"?
 
T

tongxiaozhi

#6
Thanks for your reply. Stijllor is correct. GRE stands for Graduate Record Examinations. Attached please find the words summary. Thanks for your patience in advance because the words are too many.
 

Attachments

Wes Bucey

Prophet of Profit
#7
Thanks for your reply. Stijllor is correct. GRE stands for Graduate Record Examinations. Attached please find the words summary. Thanks for your patience in advance because the words are too many.
Let me point out that there are very few native English speakers who could define EVERY word in the GRE list. Of that small percentage, there is an even smaller percentage who has EVER used every word in that list either in writing or speaking. Most native English speakers have four levels of vocabulary:

  1. Cognitive (seeing the written word, especially in context, and being able to understand its meaning)
  2. Written (words used when writing, especially when the writer is trying to convey a nuanced meaning)
  3. Hearing (words heard in context so the listener is able to get a sense of the meaning)
  4. Speaking (words used in normal conversation - versus words prepared beforehand to give in a presentation)
where each level is reduced nearly exponentially.

As I perused through the vocabulary list, I noted it was arranged or grouped with words having an affinity of some sort being grouped together. One section, for instance, had words associated with maritime activity and which had some specialized, nuanced meaning. One example was the word "frigate" (a certain kind of boat or ship.) I can identify the word to that extent, but I can't articulate the exact differences between frigate and other boats such as ancient galleys or modern destroyers without knowing the historical context in which the word is used. Thus, a native English speaker such as I, university educated, and with a very large vocabulary, would still have to resort to a reference work to further define "frigate" beyond "a type of boat or ship." In most cases, such further definition would be unnecessary.

Similarly, for non-native English speakers/users, it is not always necessary to be able to precisely define a word one comes across in casual reading or conversation if one can get a sense of its meaning from the context in which it is used. In speaking, of course, the burden is much less. If I were standing on the shore of a harbor with a companion, looking at a frigate at anchor, I would be comfortable using the word "ship" rather than "frigate" in conversation. Similarly, if I were sending a photo of that frigate to my brother, my note may say, "Here's a picture of a ship I saw in the harbor yesterday." My neighbor, however, who is a former Navy Commander, would immediately identify it as a frigate warship with other details which would escape the average observer.

To answer your direct question:
"Some" of the words in that list are useful in daily life, but pay attention to the groupings and be aware that within those groupings, a number of words are specialized beyond daily life for the majority of people. Therefore, if you live or work in a marine environment, it might be useful to know and be able to use all the specialized words in such a grouping, but they would be useless for a guy working in an automobile factory in the middle of a continent.
 

Wes Bucey

Prophet of Profit
#8
FYI:
I'm not sure where this so-called GRE word list originated, but there is one word that I came across in a grouping associated with cooking (one of my passions) that I can find no reference for: "calander"

(From the grouping, I presume it is a variant of "colander" or "cullender" which is a bowl shaped strainer (compare to a "China hat" which is a cone shaped strainer), but none of my searches turn up the spelling used in the list provided by OP. I haven't examined the list completely, but there may be many other words similarly undocumented as to accuracy.

:topic:
I was once told by one of my chef instructors that "cullender" was the original word, having to do with culling products and cull is probably the root word for "collect"
 
T

tongxiaozhi

#9
Let me point out that there are very few native English speakers who could define EVERY word in the GRE list. Of that small percentage, there is an even smaller percentage who has EVER used every word in that list either in writing or speaking. Most native English speakers have four levels of vocabulary:

  1. Cognitive (seeing the written word, especially in context, and being able to understand its meaning)
  2. Written (words used when writing, especially when the writer is trying to convey a nuanced meaning)
  3. Hearing (words heard in context so the listener is able to get a sense of the meaning)
  4. Speaking (words used in normal conversation - versus words prepared beforehand to give in a presentation)
where each level is reduced nearly exponentially.

As I perused through the vocabulary list, I noted it was arranged or grouped with words having an affinity of some sort being grouped together. One section, for instance, had words associated with maritime activity and which had some specialized, nuanced meaning. One example was the word "frigate" (a certain kind of boat or ship.) I can identify the word to that extent, but I can't articulate the exact differences between frigate and other boats such as ancient galleys or modern destroyers without knowing the historical context in which the word is used. Thus, a native English speaker such as I, university educated, and with a very large vocabulary, would still have to resort to a reference work to further define "frigate" beyond "a type of boat or ship." In most cases, such further definition would be unnecessary.

Similarly, for non-native English speakers/users, it is not always necessary to be able to precisely define a word one comes across in casual reading or conversation if one can get a sense of its meaning from the context in which it is used. In speaking, of course, the burden is much less. If I were standing on the shore of a harbor with a companion, looking at a frigate at anchor, I would be comfortable using the word "ship" rather than "frigate" in conversation. Similarly, if I were sending a photo of that frigate to my brother, my note may say, "Here's a picture of a ship I saw in the harbor yesterday." My neighbor, however, who is a former Navy Commander, would immediately identify it as a frigate warship with other details which would escape the average observer.

To answer your direct question:
"Some" of the words in that list are useful in daily life, but pay attention to the groupings and be aware that within those groupings, a number of words are specialized beyond daily life for the majority of people. Therefore, if you live or work in a marine environment, it might be useful to know and be able to use all the specialized words in such a grouping, but they would be useless for a guy working in an automobile factory in the middle of a continent.
Dear Wes, Thanks very much for your detailed explaination. As I am a non-native speaker, I am unable to identify which is useful and which is not. I guess I have to recite all the words in the list, but It will be a lot of work.
 
T

tongxiaozhi

#10
Dear Wes. Thanks. I downloaded this list from the internet, I am not sure if the meaning or spelling of the word is correct. In addition, one of my cousin is studying in US, she onced sent me GRE vocabulary she once used as attached, but I can't understand the meaning of many words as the meaning of each word is explained in English. Having been English for many years, Still very poor. I wonder if there is any shortcut to improve my poor English.
 

Attachments

Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
G Remote support - IATF allowed words defined? IATF 16949 - Automotive Quality Systems Standard 15
lanley liao How to understand this words that the planning of internal audit shall take into consideration the results of previous audits? Oil and Gas Industry Standards and Regulations 10
M Words as Symbols in Software EU Medical Device Regulations 7
R Using Exact Words from ISO 9001:2008 in Level 1 Document (Quality Assurance Manual) ISO 9000, ISO 9001, and ISO 9004 Quality Management Systems Standards 23
Ajit Basrur 20 British Words That Mean Something Totally Different in the U.S. Coffee Break and Water Cooler Discussions 38
Ajit Basrur Do you know the meaning of these words ??? Coffee Break and Water Cooler Discussions 4
T Made up terms and words! Coffee Break and Water Cooler Discussions 14
N Is there a formula to link words in Excel sheet to a graph? Excel .xls Spreadsheet Templates and Tools 5
Ajit Basrur The 27 Most Commonly Misspelled Words Coffee Break and Water Cooler Discussions 16
A DMR (Device Master Record): What is meant by these words - Software Specifications? 21 CFR Part 820 - US FDA Quality System Regulations (QSR) 10
T Signal Words for CE Mark and FDA Labels US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 7
Sam Lazzara Medical Device Labels - Use Symbols Not Words Other Medical Device Related Standards 19
N Definition IDENTIFY and DETERMINE - What is the technical difference between the words Definitions, Acronyms, Abbreviations and Interpretations Listed Alphabetically 64
U Beyond words and wonderment Coffee Break and Water Cooler Discussions 1
U Words of Wisdom The Reading Room 194
M Definitions of Documentation related words ISO 9000, ISO 9001, and ISO 9004 Quality Management Systems Standards 7
somashekar Definition Evaluate and Select ... What are the most common understandings of these words. Definitions, Acronyms, Abbreviations and Interpretations Listed Alphabetically 12
S Translation Software for Documentation with Technical Words - Recommendations wanted Quality Tools, Improvement and Analysis 5
J Words or phrases that need to be removed from auditing. General Auditing Discussions 30
J Dwile Thonking - an article I saw on World Wide Words Funny Stuff - Jokes and Humour 13
J New 3 words game Brain Teasers and Puzzles 22
P Game: 3 words at a time!!! Brain Teasers and Puzzles 43
H Fun with Rearranged Words (Anagrams) Funny Stuff - Jokes and Humour 4
N QMS Scope length limited to 10 to 15 words maximum - How is that possible? ISO 9000, ISO 9001, and ISO 9004 Quality Management Systems Standards 5
E Fun with words - Mensa Invitational challenge Funny Stuff - Jokes and Humour 6
S Sampling - Clause 8.2.4 - What do the words "known non conformities" mean here? Inspection, Prints (Drawings), Testing, Sampling and Related Topics 9
J Graphs from Minitab are Not Appearing in Words - EMBED Mtb.Graph Document? Using Minitab Software 4
Al Rosen New Vocabulary Words For 2006 Funny Stuff - Jokes and Humour 5
L Moving to a new facility - Class I and II medical devices - Words to the Wise? ISO 13485:2016 - Medical Device Quality Management Systems 2
Jim Wynne World Wide Words Book, Video, Blog and Web Site Reviews and Recommendations 2
J Sensitivity vs. Specificity - FDA won't even allow those words ISO 13485:2016 - Medical Device Quality Management Systems 3
A How many words can be made out of "QUALITY CONTROL"? Coffee Break and Water Cooler Discussions 8
I Stating our goals to satisfy customers - What words can we use? ISO 9000, ISO 9001, and ISO 9004 Quality Management Systems Standards 20
qualprod Criteria % to be useful in establishing Kpis ISO 9000, ISO 9001, and ISO 9004 Quality Management Systems Standards 19
T MDR Guidance Book - Useful for MDR transition? EU Medical Device Regulations 1
B Useful guidance documents for standards Other ISO and International Standards and European Regulations 2
M Harmonized EN 60601 Z Annexes are Not Useful IEC 60601 - Medical Electrical Equipment Safety Standards Series 0
Sidney Vianna Are the TC 176 Documents on Risk Based Thinking useful to you? ISO 9000, ISO 9001, and ISO 9004 Quality Management Systems Standards 13
A Is MSA useful to prove a Measurement System after Relocation? Gage R&R (GR&R) and MSA (Measurement Systems Analysis) 2
S Medical Device Regulations Worldwide - Useful Whitepaper Other Medical Device Regulations World-Wide 3
S Is ISO 50001 Certification useful for an Auto Components Manufacturer? Sustainability, Green Initiatives and Ecology 7
C Internal Auditing - How to make it useful? Internal Auditing 36
M Some useful information about the latest PPAP version - PPAP 4th edition APQP and PPAP 1
Q Use As Is, Repair, Rework - Useful when categorizing? ISO 9000, ISO 9001, and ISO 9004 Quality Management Systems Standards 5
R What is a Z Value/Factor and where is it most useful? Statistical Analysis Tools, Techniques and SPC 4
Antonio Vieira Quality Councils - Do they still exist? Are they useful? Philosophy, Gurus, Innovation and Evolution 5
M Useful Air Quality Tool for Livestock - US Air Quality Site Assesment Tool Sustainability, Green Initiatives and Ecology 2
Mikilk B-GMP Audit (Anvisa Brazil) - Checklist in English or other useful documents wanted Other Medical Device Regulations World-Wide 6
AnaMariaVR2 What online communities are useful to your career? Career and Occupation Discussions 12
R Is it useful to adapt PFMEA's with nonconformances? FMEA and Control Plans 4

Similar threads

Top Bottom