AS9120B - How to meet clause 7 Support that covers 7.1., 7.1.1, 7.1.2, & 7.1.3?

wbrand

Starting to get Involved
#1
Hi All,

Does anyone have an example on how to meet clause 7 Support that covers 7.1., 7.1.1, 7.1.2, & 7.1.3? My company is being audited and the auditor is asking how we address our planing approach? Like what we will do once we reach our max capacity in the warehouse or at what point will we address that ops will need more personnel?

Also how would we be address Key Organizational Knowledge? Key personnel that carry the skills to conduct business. If they were to leave, how do we plan for replacements? Sounds simple but is he looking for specifics?? Thanks in advance.
 

Marc

Retired Old Goat
Staff member
Admin
#3
Like what we will do once we reach our max capacity in the warehouse
The problem is - No company can plan for every potential event. However, in this specific case, I saw it come up in the QS/TS days. It was explained, in the specific case I remember, that the company monitored warehouse levels, and that should such an event become imminent they would contact local storage companies to see what alternatives were available at that specific time.

In short, this is one the things in being audited. The company employees have to be ready to discuss these things and have some idea of what they would probably do. You could bring in "Risk Analysis" in the sense that even if you do not make a paper or electronic "documented" risk evaluation of that specific event, people are typically thinking about risks, as they should be.

Sometimes an auditor will not be happy with long discussions, having been taught, or having experienced, ways a company may attempt to run out an auditor's clock, so to speak, but my opinion if is the auditor is not clear, if the requirement is not clear, the only way to proceed is to discuss. In the case of
Like what we will do once we reach our max capacity in the warehouse
- I am not aware of a requirement that there be a specific plan for that specific event. The main point is that someone in your company does think about that possibility. In the scenario I mention above it came down to the evidence that the company monitored warehouse levels and had a few years or more of data, so they knew the trends. They considered over production and/or receding sales a relatively minor risk that there could be no specific plan for because conditions for definite plan(s) (such as companies which rent storage areas) would not necessarily be realistic. E.g.: A flood event where companies which rent warehouse space, and which normally have plenty of space, are full because of the weather event, or are themselves flooded.

Key personnel that carry the skills to conduct business.
Some companies have plans for key personnel quitting, or being fired, or what ever, but like above - What is your thought process? It can not be much more than to reassign some duties to other(s), which is sometimes sufficient, but if they need a specialist who knows what specialist will be available to hire? If reassigning duties to other(s) isn't sufficient, HR has to do their job and find a replacement specialist.

Just some thoughts.
 

wbrand

Starting to get Involved
#5
The problem is - No company can plan for every potential event. However, in this specific case, I saw it come up in the QS/TS days. It was explained, in the specific case I remember, that the company monitored warehouse levels, and that should such an event become imminent they would contact local storage companies to see what alternatives were available at that specific time.

In short, this is one the things in being audited. The company employees have to be ready to discuss these things and have some idea of what they would probably do. You could bring in "Risk Analysis" in the sense that even if you do not make a paper or electronic "documented" risk evaluation of that specific event, people are typically thinking about risks, as they should be.

Sometimes an auditor will not be happy with long discussions, having been taught, or having experienced, ways a company may attempt to run out an auditor's clock, so to speak, but my opinion if is the auditor is not clear, if the requirement is not clear, the only way to proceed is to discuss. In the case of - I am not aware of a requirement that there be a specific plan for that specific event. The main point is that someone in your company does think about that possibility. In the scenario I mention above it came down to the evidence that the company monitored warehouse levels and had a few years or more of data, so they knew the trends. They considered over production and/or receding sales a relatively minor risk that there could be no specific plan for because conditions for definite plan(s) (such as companies which rent storage areas) would not necessarily be realistic. E.g.: A flood event where companies which rent warehouse space, and which normally have plenty of space, are full because of the weather event, or are themselves flooded.

Some companies have plans for key personnel quitting, or being fired, or what ever, but like above - What is your thought process? It can not be much more than to reassign some duties to other(s), which is sometimes sufficient, but if they need a specialist who knows what specialist will be available to hire? If reassigning duties to other(s) isn't sufficient, HR has to do their job and find a replacement specialist.

Just some thoughts.
Hi Marc,

Thanks for the reply. You do bring up some good thoughts. I will put on my thinking cap and expand from here. Thx.
 

kdburkh0214

Starting to get Involved
#6
Hi KD,
At the moment we don't. Never thought we would as a AS9120 company.
Even if you weren't certified to any standard, I would recommend a contingency plan. Tribal knowledge is sometimes hard to avoid but at least with a contingency plan you can show evidence of some kind of back up.
 

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