Bare Bones/Under the Radar ISO9001:2015

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Brian Hunt

I'm working for a UK property company that is growing organically and by acquisition. Business processes, training, responsibilities and accountabilities are in a mess and ISO9001/Quality is a dirty word.

I'm working as a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt, but am also an ex Quality Manager and Manufacturing Engineer. I'm working with their procurement function and can see how a business management system using the fundamentals of ISO9001:2015 would be a major benefit. I'll plan how to sneak that in - but any comments and advice on doing this would be appreciated.

Thanks

Brian
 

Paul Simpson

Trusted Information Resource
Hi, Brian. I'd emphasise the need to manage risk in a time of growth and change. The need for clear accountabilities and delegated authority. A simple 'who does what' that is reviewed with responsibilities reallocated if someone moves on is a great start. You can then start to bring in the 'if we mapped this out it will be easier to get someone up and running quicker' piece and don't worry too much about the document control / objective setting piece until people see the value of what you are doing.

Don't forget to let people know when your 'system lite' saves time / effort / cost.
 
I'll plan how to sneak that in - but any comments and advice on doing this would be appreciated.
Yeah, what Paul said, and there is no need to sneak it in, really: Just say that "This is how I want things done, but any suggestions are welcome". There is no need to mention that ISO 9001 is lurking in the background, is there? :cool:
 
B

Brian Hunt

Thanks Paul, that's a good summary of the key points. Hi Claes, ISO and quality are dirty words here and I'm an interim - so this has to be covert!
 

Ian_Morris

Involved In Discussions
Hi Paul,

I have had experience of introducing and maintaining ISO9001 in professional service organisations where it is poorly perceived due to previous poor implementation and management resulting in a checkbox culture that is seen as not adding value and preventing work.

In these situations I have found that the best way is to engage in debate and explain all the reasons that their negative perception of ISO9001 is wrong and how it works, starting with ISO9001 doesn't tell them what they need to do to carry out their work, as this is done by laws, regulations and contractual requirements.

I then work with them to understand why they do each element of the process and focus on what the outputs and controls are so that they are carried out and maintained - simple process management really and all consistent with ISO9001.

In your situation, I would introduce the system for procurement, using the 9001 for your framework, without mentioning that the standard is the source.

Once it is up and running and the new process and controls are improving the effectiveness of the supply chain, I would share how everything fits within the requirements of ISO9001 and start the revolution from there.

Hope this helps.
 
Brian - first step is to ascertain WHY there is associated negativity. As soon as you are settled in try a few Force Field analysis exercises to determine where the opposites are and who is the leverage behind them, then tailor your approach to target the cause of the negativity to the most leveraged personnel behind it.
This works pretty well in these cases, although if you are the 'new guy' beware of unseen connections behind the leveraged people. Sometimes the person you least suspect wields the most influence! I adjust the FFA frequently to accounts for these discovered 'relationships'.
 

Ninja

Looking for Reality
Trusted Information Resource
Thanks Paul, that's a good summary of the key points. Hi Claes, ISO and quality are dirty words here and I'm an interim - so this has to be covert!

"Common Sense", "Logical", "Responsible", "Safety and job security", "Doing it right more often".
These are terms that seem safe...and pretty much mean the same thing...aspect by aspect.

:2cents:
 
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