Buenos dias

A

Adriana Urbina

:D

Hi : I'm also from Cd. Juarez , and I been reading from this forum since long time ago , only that I haven't enough confident to reply . and may be I was able to find everything .

I hope everybody understand.


Regards .
 

Wes Bucey

Prophet of Profit
I'm still upset that our collective communication skills to date are such that we don't know if Norma has a need for information or if she just wants to join the party.

Buenos dias
Ah! the arrogance of Anglos, whose language has become the language of commerce throughout the world by default. At one time, it was Latin; later "Lingua Franca" (French) became the language of diplomacy, but two World Wars ended that. Somehow, we continue to think the predominance of English in world commerce has something to do with superiority instead of lucky happenstance and a willingness to adopt words from other languages and make them our own - (coyote, arroyo, blitz, schlemiel, wigwam, chipmunk, moose, moccasin, marijuana, chocolate, waffle, cookie, boss, boomerang, etc.) to make English the most vocabulary-rich language in history. New words are consantly invented, and, if they serve a need, adopted and used by others. Thomas Jefferson, the chief draftsman (not draughtsman) of the American Declaration of Independence was credited with "belittle" and Benjamin Franklin, the diplomat, inventor, and printer, is one of the major reasons Americans spell "honor" instead of "honour"; "plow" instead of "plough"; "theater" instead of "theatre."


The "schmucks" who sit around the "barbecue" wearing "mocassins" watching a "chipmunk" in the yard are the first ones to say, "If I were "boss," I wouldn't "waffle" around because I'm one tough "cookie" - so I'd make it a law that only "English" could be spoken in "America.""
(I included "America" because it's named after an Italian mapmaker; "English" because it was originally "Angle" after a group of invaders from what is now Denmark. Oddly, to put "English" on a billiard ball is after French "anglé.")

The "history" (Latin "historia") of English is a "fascinating" (Latin "fascinare") "study" (Latin "studium".)

Here's a fun site to add to your reference list:
https://www.etymonline.com/
an on-line etymology dictionary (free)
 
A

Adriana Urbina

I think she didn't need specific information, maybe she got to the forum and started to read the threads , that was when she became curious to know if there are an Spanish forum like this, she doesn't explain why ? or if she was looking for something .

Regards. :tg:
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Leader
Admin
Adriana Urbina said:
:D

Hi : I'm also from Cd. Juarez , and I been reading from this forum since long time ago , only that I haven't enough confident to reply . and may be I was able to find everything . I hope everybody understand.

Regards .
Adriana, welcome! :bigwave:

I hope that you will feel confident to reply, as all experiences are relevant and all are welcome here. If you do not find everything you search for, please ask specifically and we will attempt to assist you.

Regards,

Jennifer
 
J

JimCubb - 2005

This should be very close

Norma said:
Hola, soy nueva por aqui
Alguien me podria decir donde debo de entrar para unos de los foros en español?
GRacias :eek:

Hi, I am new here.

Who might be able to tell me where I have to enter for some of the forums in Spanish? [More idiomatically – Can someone tell me how to get to the Spanish language forums?]

I suspect a troll here. A Spanish keyboard should have spelled podría correctly. I hope I am wrong.

:topic: Cd. is the abbreviation for "Ciudad" [City], in case anyone wondered.
 

Wes Bucey

Prophet of Profit
JimCubb said:
Hi, I am new here.

Who might be able to tell me where I have to enter for some of the forums in Spanish? [More idiomatically – Can someone tell me how to get to the Spanish language forums?]

I suspect a troll here. A Spanish keyboard should have spelled podría correctly. I hope I am wrong.

:topic: Cd. is the abbreviation for "Ciudad" [City], in case anyone wondered.
Hey! Look around - typos are the rule, not the exception, in Forums everywhere. The poster just made an error. I hasten to point out that grammar usage and spelling are close behind typographical errors in contributing to some head scratching in interpreting posts ostensibly made in English by native English speakers, why not in Spanish as well?
 
L

lvivas

translation

"Can someone tell me how to get to the Spanish forums?" is the closest translation I've read so far. I don't think you can get any closer.

A big thanks to arios for offering help. It is not easy to read,write, and type so well in espanol, much less find all the little punctuation marks that go with the words.
Lori V.
 
J

JimCubb - 2005

Point Taken

Wes Bucey said:
Hey! Look around - typos are the rule, not the exception, in Forums everywhere. The poster just made an error. I hasten to point out that grammar usage and spelling are close behind typographical errors in contributing to some head scratching in interpreting posts ostensibly made in English by native English speakers, why not in Spanish as well?

There is a print advertisement for a type of chair that has "of" spelled "od" right in the center of the page. Every morning on my way to work I see an electronic billboard that says, "Rent too buy". (That was hard to type.)

It may be that people who have to think about writing a language are the ones who worry about such things. On another forum to which I belong there is a Finnish woman who posts regularly and has almost never made a spelling, grammar or typing error. The three times that she did make errors, all typos, were cause for a thread of amazement.
 

Jim Wynne

Leader
Admin
Jim Cubb said:
It may be that people who have to think about writing a language are the ones who worry about such things.
I had a conversation on an airplane once with a linguistics professor about this subject. She said that "fluency" in a language consists in being able to think idiomatically in the language in question. If you have to do word-by-word translation (or interpretation) without understanding idiom, you're bound to screw something up. To explain the signifigance of "idiom," there was an intern from Germany in a company where I worked several years ago. Her English was very good, but I could see her hesitating now and then, and you could see the wheels turning as she tried to process an unusual phrase or bit of usage. In a lunchroom conversation one day I asked her what she found most unusual about the US. She thought about it for a second and said that on her first day here, a coworker passing her in a corridor smiled and said "Hi, how are you?" as he was passing. She stopped, prepared to tell him, and was surprised that he kept going without waiting for an answer. "In Germany, when we ask someone how they are, it's because we want to know how they are," she explained.
 
L

Laura M

Wie geits? (Do I remember 'how are you' in German, correctly? I know it's pronouced 'gates' just not sure of spelling.)

No Spanish for me, although I did visit Juarez, Chihuahua and Ramos Arizpe on various business trips. Learned enought to get by- cervase' seemed to be a key word.
 
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