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Calibration certificate content - Average Value and True Value

fahimk

Involved In Discussions
#1
Dear Fellows:

In a calibration certificate, there are TWO (02) columns under the major heading "Reference/Calibration Standard". The columns are titled "Average Value" and "True Value".

What is the difference between these two values? What in case the instrument is being calibrated for the first time?

Thanks and regards,
 
#2
Dear Fellows:

In a calibration certificate, there are TWO (02) columns under the major heading "Reference/Calibration Standard". The columns are titled "Average Value" and "True Value".

What is the difference between these two values? What in case the instrument is being calibrated for the first time?

Thanks and regards,
Since calibration certificate formats all differ it would be much better if you could attach a copy of the certificate so that we can see what it says in full context.
 

dgriffith

Quite Involved in Discussions
#3
Without a copy of the cert, a wild guess might be the average of readings from your calibration standard (if you are using one), or the established or consensus value of a fixed point standard as the Reference value (if you are using that (triple point of water cell, resistor standard, etc.))

Did the cert come from a vendor or is it yours?
 
#5
I am not sure what the creator of this certificate template meant here.
My educated guess is that the "Average Value" is what I would call the Nominal value.
For instance, say you have a 100 g weight. That would be the "Average Value"
The "True Value" would be the actual measured value of the weight found on its calibration certificate, such as 100.0023 g
You would use the True Value when computing the Deviation Error for the Equipment Under Calibration
 

Gus

Starting to get Involved
#7
Have'nt seen the certificate but from what i read looks like the author is missing this:

BIPM - International Vocabulary of Metrology (VIM)

IDK about requirements in other countries but in a strict sense, i have been led to believe that all 17025 accredited labs should know and abide by the VIM guide in their respective languages (its a long read but it does add value to your expertise IMHO)
 
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