Can YOU help? --> Unanswered questions <-- (Other than Marcelo's Informational posts)

CE Marking EN ISO 13849-1: Electrical Panel behind interlocked doors

prephil

Starting to get Involved
#1
Anyone know if having a machines main electrical panel behind interlocked enclosure doors contravenes the machinery directive and therefore interferes with CE marking? Basically it means that the panel is only accessible once the machine is estopped or the mains electrical isolator/disconnect switch is turned off as the interlocks would then turn off and allow access to the electrical panel.
 
Last edited:

CharlieUK

Involved In Discussions
#3
I'm not aware of any issue with that - I've seen plenty of systems with a large 0/1 rotator switch built into the electrical panel door and there's nothing in Annex I of the MD, or standards such as EN 60204 or EN61010-1 that I can find to stop you doing it
 

CharlieUK

Involved In Discussions
#5
Maybe I misunderstood your question.
I was referring to the situation where the main isolator switch was a 90 degree rotation one with an extension shaft that was turned via a rotary knob on the panel - you can only open the door by turning the device off which unlocks the extension bar from the isolator allowing the door to be opened.

Do you need to interlock the electrical panel to provide guarding against moving parts?
 

prephil

Starting to get Involved
#7
Here's what I mean in terms of the electrical panel being behind closed interlocked doors. Doors 1 and 2 are mechanically interlocked so they won't open until power is off. Electrical enclosure is inside these 2 doors.
1560870387375.png
 

CharlieUK

Involved In Discussions
#8
The power is "off" to what?
With the example of the rotating isolator, the only thing with power are the incoming terminals on the isolator.
In your example I think it would be impossible to answer without seeing the wiring diagram.

That said, I don't foresee a problem with your approach, but you should cover it in your risk assessment and your Annex I EHSR assessment
 

prephil

Starting to get Involved
#9
I should be clearer in my explanation. In order to open doors 1 and 2, the machine would either need to be estopped or mains power set to the off position.
It is now possible to get access to the electrical panel but not possible to troubleshoot it. Typically, panels are not located behind interlocked doors so that troubleshooting is possible.
 

CharlieUK

Involved In Discussions
#10
Troubleshooting is typically performed by trained service personnel - depending on the design your risk assessment can take different considerations for this
To answer your initial question as to whether it contravenes the Machinery Directive - no I don't think it does, but equally I don't think this is an issue that can be fully resolved on a question forum as advice should include full access to wiring diagrams, operating and service manuals and the machine itself
 

Top Bottom