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Circular vs. Linear - We look at systems the wrong way

Kevin Mader

One of THE Original Covers!
Staff member
Admin
#21
Marc,

Forced compliance to me, is a mistake. Especially without quantifiable proof that such a standard generates a positive gain for either party. Too me, this theory is unproven and faulty.

Instant Pudding anyone?

Regards,

Kevin
 

Kevin Mader

One of THE Original Covers!
Staff member
Admin
#22
Reread my earlier post and forgot one important detail - my comment was applied to Voluntary Standards (as noted in your post).

For Regulatory guidelines, I guess a certain level of mandated protocols may improve product safety and without a minimum requirement, organizations can run unchecked. However, I must admit that I have not read of any correlation studies that have been performed demonstrating that compliant organizations perform better or produce safer product.

Regards,

Kevin
 

Kevin Mader

One of THE Original Covers!
Staff member
Admin
#23
Reread my earlier post and forgot one important detail - my comment was applied to Voluntary Standards (ISO).

For Regulatory guidelines, I guess a certain level of mandated protocols may improve product safety and without a minimum requirement, organizations can run unchecked. However, I must admit that I have not read of any correlation studies that have been performed demonstrating that compliant organizations perform better or produce safer product.

For Customer Driven requirements, well, some wishful thinking. Still no proof that by being registered, quality or profitability will be increased.

Regards,

Kevin

[This message has been edited by Kevin Mader (edited 16 May 2000).]
 
N

Navigator

#24
I look at it this way...

ISO9000 is a nice idea. left to their own methods, most companies do what is necesary. On the other side of the fence is stuff like safety and environmental (regulatory) aspects. Few companies can be trusted to set 'proper levels' such as, for example, CO2 emission levels. In the same vein, companies cannot always be trusted to, on their own, set 'reasonable' safety standards. This is where the government comes in and sets standards for them.

All I can think of is safety and environmental, off hand. None the less, neither of these in any way relate to ISO9000.

"Still no proof that by being registered, quality or profitability will be increased." True, true.
 

Marc

Captain Nice
Staff member
Admin
#25
Originally posted by Kevin Mader:
Marc,

Forced compliance to me is a mistake. Especially without quantifiable proof that such a standard generates a positive gain for either party. Too me, this theory is unproven and faulty.
Yes, yes, yes.

[This message has been edited by Marc Smith (edited 03 June 2000).]
 
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