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Company and Departmental Measurable Goals - How many, by whom...

I

Ingeniero1

#1
We have four 'generic' company goals and they are somewhat vague as far as being measurable.

We also have three to five goals for each department; some of these are one-time goals, others are on going, and all are measurable. These goals are documented together with what constitutes evidence for each.

Do we need to have 'company wide' goals that are measurable, or are the individual department goals sufficient?

Thanks,

Alex
 
R

Rachel

#2
Alex,

It's my opinion that you set the goals that are important to you. However, having said that, if you make claims in your mission statement/company policy/etc., make sure that they're supported. For example, we got an OFI in our 9K2K registration audit because our quality policy states that "we set goals in the areas of productivity, efficiency, quality and safety..." and "our progress toward these goals is measured and monitored". In our key measurables/KPIs/whatever, we had tons supporting safety and quality, but very little supporting productivity and efficiency. Again, just an OFI, but still something to think about.

We set goals based on what's important and valuable to us. If you work in an office setting, tracking health and safety as a KPI may not be as big of a focus for you as if you were working in with heavy machinery. If you have automated packaging of your product, then dock auditing may not be a valuable KPI for you. Again, it depends on what makes sense for your business, and what's valuable for your business. If you incorporate R&D, then maybe a yearly products-to-market measurable might be worth your while. I don't know.

You probably have both types of goals already. For example, our defect rate goals vary from dept to dept - because the processes have different levels of human input that vary in difficulty. Our H&S goal, however, is plant-wide. Return of goods is also plant-wide - because anyone can cause an ROG (order recorded incorrectly - CS, picked incorrectly - Shipping, defective material - manufacturing/QA, etc.).

I don't know how much help I've been. All I can suggest is that you take a look at your processes and try your best to pinpoint valuable outputs that will give you a better idea of how your business is doing. There's another thread that has been flying around lately about this topic - I will try to find the link.

Cheers,
-R.
 
C

C Emmons

#3
Ingeniero1 said:
We have four 'generic' company goals and they are somewhat vague as far as being measurable.

We also have three to five goals for each department; some of these are one-time goals, others are on going, and all are measurable. These goals are documented together with what constitutes evidence for each.

Do we need to have 'company wide' goals that are measurable, or are the individual department goals sufficient?

Thanks,

Alex
In my opinion you need both. Company wide goals should be the ones idenitifed by upper managgement. Strategic goals overall. For instance. I have 19 facilities and a Corporate office. Upper Management (Corporate) has identifed 4 Goals for the System as a whole. I also expect each manager of a facility to identify goals specific for his/her operation. Areas that they have control over in there terminals. ie: absenteesim,production numbers, etc.
 
#4
Ingeniero1 said:
We have four 'generic' company goals and they are somewhat vague as far as being measurable.

We also have three to five goals for each department; some of these are one-time goals, others are on going, and all are measurable. These goals are documented together with what constitutes evidence for each.

Do we need to have 'company wide' goals that are measurable, or are the individual department goals sufficient?

Thanks,

Alex

Well.... If we are talking about the Quality Objectives outlined in 5.4.1, then there are very specific rules for these. They must be "measurable". Also, because the language includes “including those needed to meet requirements for product”, one could argue (and I would agree) that “company-wide” goals are required.
 

The Taz!

Quite Involved in Discussions
#5
db said:
Well.... If we are talking about the Quality Objectives outlined in 5.4.1, then there are very specific rules for these. They must be "measurable". Also, because the language includes “including those needed to meet requirements for product”, one could argue (and I would agree) that “company-wide” goals are required.
To extend this thought a bit. . . they must also be "achievable" . . . . and achievable within a "reasonable" period of time.

One company I worked with had a goal of "eliminating variation". . . sorry. . .not in this galaxy or this lifetime. . .
 
I

Ingeniero1

#6
OK, I understand, and all the responses make sense. Here is what I will propose we do.

In our Quality Manual, right under our Quality Policy, we state how we will achieve our Quality Policy, which is our overall goal. This includes four items, and although not labeled as such, they clearly are goals. The first is vague and generic, but the other three are rather specific; furthermore, we can show evidence of how well we are progressing towards them:

• Our dedication to maintain and enhance our well-established and widely recognized reputation for Quality products. (VAGUE)

• Our endeavor to continually improve our methods and practices using state-of-the-art multi-media communication platforms to ensure that in addition to their inherent Quality, our products also represent the highest value and excellence in the industry. (Verifiable - we can show people we have hired to work on this, equipment purchased, and results towards this goal.)

• Implementing and following an effective Quality Management System that meets the requirements of the ISO 9001:2000 International Standard. (DEFINITELY VERIFIABLE)

• Continual reevaluation of customer needs and desires, and dissemination of those findings throughout the organization. (Verifiable or measurable - although recording of results had been vague in the past, but are now clearly specified by the new procedure.)

In your opinion, are these close enough?

THANKS!!!

Alex
 
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