Containment help

TacitBlue

Involved In Discussions
We got an NC finding because We failed to complete one of our logs related to minor document changes. We also did not have the log process as part of our overall document procedure. Root cause was because our procedure did not state the specifics of when and where to complete the required log entries. For containment, I put down that we will go back two years from the audit to make sure we didn’t miss anything on the log. And that we would make sure the missing entry we got hit for was recorded on our log. Paraphrasing here. I was told this is not a containment? What would be a good containment strategy in this case?
 

Bev D

Heretical Statistician
Leader
Super Moderator
I think that does constitute containment. Why does the person who said it wasn’t containment think it wasn’t containment?
 

John Predmore

Trusted Information Resource
I tried to think what might be missing - how I interpreted what you wrote is go back two years to make sure entries on the log are complete. But what if there were actions that should have been on the log that never got entered on the log? Is there a way to generate a list of what might be missing all together?

Maybe what I describe is what you meant. The English language can be imprecise at times. @Bev D had the best answer- ask the person who made a judgement to explain his/her thinking.
 

malasuerte

Quite Involved in Discussions
We got an NC finding because We failed to complete one of our logs related to minor document changes. We also did not have the log process as part of our overall document procedure. Root cause was because our procedure did not state the specifics of when and where to complete the required log entries. For containment, I put down that we will go back two years from the audit to make sure we didn’t miss anything on the log. And that we would make sure the missing entry we got hit for was recorded on our log. Paraphrasing here. I was told this is not a containment? What would be a good containment strategy in this case?


So what you are doing is not really containment, it is correction - you are correcting any past issues.

What is being asked for is: What you are putting in place right this moment, so it does not happen tomorrow/again?

Example: If a water pipe bursts, my containment is shut off the main water source immediately.

Are you updating the procedure immediately? Are you sending out comms immediately? are you putting in a check in place until you put a permanent solution?
 

Ron Rompen

Trusted Information Resource
I agree with malasuerte - containment is what you do to prevent further problems, while you determine an appropriate corrective action. In manufacturing it would be increased inspection frequency, reduced tolerances, something of that nature. In this case, you need to do 'something' to prevent this from occurring again.
 

Cari Spears

Super Moderator
Leader
Super Moderator
Containment is not preventing it from recurring, preventing it from recurring is corrective action. Containment is looking at where any other nonconforming product/process might be right now and removing it from the normal flow of work to deal with it as soon as possible.

What the OP described sounds like containment to me. I'll be interested to hear why the person who said it isn't containment said so.
 

Sidney Vianna

Post Responsibly
Leader
Admin
Please be aware that containment for non product related nonconformities MIGHT not be necessary. Check Containment Actions for NCRs (AS9100 C) that are not Product related

As for the definition of containment ==> From the IAQG Dictionary:

Action to control and mitigate the impact of a nonconformity and protect the customer's operation (stop the problem from getting worse); includes correction, immediate corrective action, immediate communication, and verification that the nonconforming situation does not further degrade
 

Zero_yield

"You can observe a lot by just watching."
From the IAQG Dictionary:

Action to control and mitigate the impact of a nonconformity and protect the customer's operation (stop the problem from getting worse); includes correction, immediate corrective action, immediate communication, and verification that the nonconforming situation does not further degrade

Interesting. From a medical device background, I would have said "containment" ended at "correction". Doing a little digging, I see several med dev sources talking about "containment" as the immediate remedial action.

The IAQG definition includes corrective action and effectiveness check.
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Leader
Admin
In my world it means checking to see that other similar things are not happening (are there other logs that might not be getting filled out due to lack of specific instruction?) If it's product related that means checking the process and shelves for more potentially defective parts, as well as the shipping queue and even consider if some are in shipment. We call it a "left/right look." The check could even extend to similar parts getting the same process treatment.
 
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