Controlled Copy Stamp on "Paper Originals"

#1
Dear Sirs,
I would like to ask that i have orignal comany documents with signatures, i need to distribute to other Departments, my question is that either can i "Controlled Copy" stamp on orignal document then make it photocopy and then distribute or 1st make photo copy and then Controlled Copy stamp on photo copy documets.:confused:
Actully m not a document controller just my boss give me this task that u will distribute the document ...:(

Thanks in advance ...:agree:
 

Marc

Captain Nice
Staff member
Admin
#2
Since you are asking about a "Controlled Copy" stamp, I *assume* you are referring to paper copies. Is this correct?
 
D

Dudes

#4
I would copy first and then stamp.

If you do the opposite, you have no way of being sure that there won't be any additional copies being made and circulated. Those "unofficial" controlled copies would not show up in your system and you would lose the advantage of having a controlled copy....
 

Wes Bucey

Consultant/Advisor
Moderator
#5
As an added note:
when using a copy stamp of any kind, it is usually a good practice to use a colored ink different from the ink of the text. Long ago, before copiers got so good, we were able to use a special light blue ink that was not easily picked up by a photocopier - I believe it was called "non repro blue" (long before the days of desktop publishing, when "keyline" and "paste up" were everyday terms in publishing) Today, you'd worry that a good color copier could duplicate ANY color.
 
K

Ka Pilo

#6
Dear Sirs,
I would like to ask that i have orignal comany documents with signatures, i need to distribute to other Departments, my question is that either can i "Controlled Copy" stamp on orignal document then make it photocopy and then distribute or 1st make photo copy and then Controlled Copy stamp on photo copy documets.:confused:
Actully m not a document controller just my boss give me this task that u will distribute the document ...:(

Thanks in advance ...:agree:
I suggest valid documents should be identified as such by means of a "Controlled Copy" stamp EXCEPT for the OROGINAL COPY, which is distinguished by signature of authorized personnel who prepared, reviewed and approved the documents. If you stamped the original document with "Controlled Copy" and somebody requested for "Uncontrolled copy" for whatever reasons (e.g. audit, training purposes, etc), the "Controlled Copy" will still reflect in the xerox copy even if it is uncontrolled copy.
 
J

Jeff Frost

#7
As an added note:
when using a copy stamp of any kind, it is usually a good practice to use a colored ink different from the ink of the text. Long ago, before copiers got so good, we were able to use a special light blue ink that was not easily picked up by a photocopier - I believe it was called "non repro blue" (long before the days of desktop publishing, when "keyline" and "paste up" were everyday terms in publishing) Today, you'd worry that a good color copier could duplicate ANY color.
For this very reason we long ago switched over to printing the documents on special security paper that had a light gray background color. When a copy was made of the distributed original it would result in a copy containing the work “copy” behind the document text.
 

Bogie

Involved In Discussions
#8
We do not stamp the originals, and stamp the distributed copy in red ink. Also, we specify in the footer of documents that "document is uncontrolled unless stamped 'Controlled' in RED ink".

So if any copies are made of the controlled document, the stamp shows up in black and the footer explains that it eally isn't controlled.
 

Wes Bucey

Consultant/Advisor
Moderator
#9
We do not stamp the originals, and stamp the distributed copy in red ink. Also, we specify in the footer of documents that "document is uncontrolled unless stamped 'Controlled' in RED ink".

So if any copies are made of the controlled document, the stamp shows up in black and the footer explains that it eally isn't controlled.
Yeah, but my scanner is pretty terrific and when I print out a scan on one of my color printers, I'm hard pressed to tell which is which, except that sometimes the stamp ink will smear with a wet thumb!;)

the point being: every copier is not strictly black and white.
 

Wes Bucey

Consultant/Advisor
Moderator
#10
For this very reason we long ago switched over to printing the documents on special security paper that had a light gray background color. When a copy was made of the distributed original it would result in a copy containing the work “copy” behind the document text.
I'm curious, without me googling paper manufacturers and checking prices:
Do you have any idea what the surcharge is for security paper like that over archive quality stationery?

As I recall, archive quality paper (low acid, etc.) was pretty expensive relative to 20 or 24 pound bond.
 

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