"Controlled" stamp for Controlled Documents - Any alternatives?

B

bubonic

#11
Whatever happened to good old fashioned "printing of copies will lead to disciplinary action"?:whip:
In this day and age of computer geeks who can hack into NASA there is virtually no point in trying to make documents ultra secure with little more than sticky plaster which just becomes a challenge to the would be hacker.
Having said that, my staff haven't the time nor inclination to download illicit copies of documents.
I would also agree we don't pander to those who would like their own copy of ... All our documents are available on-line to our staff with password protection. On rare occasions for training purposes I (compliance manager) will copy some documents or extracts of documents and these are stamped over as "uncontrolled document". This is as stated in our document control procedure.
"Keep it simple" :yes:
 
J

JaneB

#12
Wasting time on adding stamps is not efficient (and is it really necessary?)

Use automated features in Word - that's what they're designed for.

As Stijloor said, put stuff in headers & footers.

If you must have this and want it to REALLY stand out, you could also use a watermark instead of footer/header (less cluttering in headers/footers) - see attachment for an illustration. Under Format, Text, Printed Watermark in Word 2003. See an example here of instructions how to do that.

You don't have to just accept the defaults offered by Word - just type in what you want in the Text field, and alter the colours etc to suit (I gave it a darker grey than the default option).
 
P

Phiobi

#15
Hi Stijloor,
The idea is great, but the problem is some users, for traditional purposes, like keeping and refering to the hardcopies. I can not refrain the others for keeping hardcopies in their offices.
I wonder if someone knows how to label a document with " uncontrolled copy" when printing out a controlled document, using Office Word 2003.
I had a problem once we installed colour photocopiers, it didn't matter what colour you stamped or printed we could not show that it was the intended controlled document. As we need some documents like work instructions to be on the shop floor with the operators as they work on our parts we have bought a Dymo label printer. This is then a physical way to identify a 'master' or controlled document. It prevents anybody making copies as we only have one computer that can print the labels. It has been trained into the guys that anybody found with a photocopy of a document will get a warning and now I have NO issues of uncontrolled documents.

I know a label is not 'value added' but it does make life a lot eaier for us and our 8,000 circulated documents!!! (in hard paper type)
 

bobdoering

Stop X-bar/R Madness!!
Trusted
#16
I had a problem once we installed colour photocopiers, it didn't matter what colour you stamped or printed we could not show that it was the intended controlled document. As we need some documents like work instructions to be on the shop floor with the operators as they work on our parts we have bought a Dymo label printer.
Good point. Another approach that can defeat a color copier - and might be cheaper and faster than the label printer in the long run - is an embosser (like the ones used by notaries).
 
J

JaneB

#17
I know a label is not 'value added' but it does make life a lot eaier for us and our 8,000 circulated documents!!! (in hard paper type)
Phew, Phiobi, 8000 circulated documents is one heck of a lot of documents to have to control, you have my empathy.

Please don't hear me as saying 'never' use stamps, labels, etc. I constantly advocate making things easier and simpler. Yes, I do query the value of just doing it blindly. And then someone like you pops up and reminds me that there is/can be a place for such things (thanks!) in some cases.

'Horses for courses' - the best system is the one that works for you in your particular situation. You've hit the nail on the head by saying it makes life 'a lot easier'. And that's the critical thing. ;)
 

rogerpenna

Involved In Discussions
#18
It seems to me some people are saying that "hard copies" are bad habits.

Well, I guess that if you work in an office, it is a bad habit to have a hard copy (might save you if you need to check that procedure at the exat time a blackout ensues, but ok, that is a small chance), but are you guys thinking about offices?

What about a civil engineering company with projects going on in areas with bad internet connection. Which is actually my situation.

Our engineers actually carry a folder with all procedures as controlled copies. Plus the Worksite Quality Plan (Plano de Qualidade da Obra), which is almost like a Quality Manual for each different workjob, demanded by the PBQP-H Certification (a brazilian construction/engineering certification based on ISO, but adapted for civil construction, and more rigorous and a little less flexible in some things).

It's some 30-40 documents each engineer carry around... so "documented information can be available and adequate for use where and when it's necessary". A pain in the ass really, to control all those hard copies.
 

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