Costs, Benefits, and Consequences of ISO 9001

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batman1056

I have been asked by management to undertake a review which considers the costs, benefits and consequences of having a recognised number of accredited set of management arrangements. Consider the scope of the alternatives in terms of function, activities and geography.

Anybody got any reports similar which put forward the business case for 9001/14001/18001? Ideally I am looking for cases which provide evidence why there is not a business case for implementation.
 
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bigqman

"Anybody got any reports similar which put forward the business case for 9001/14001/18001? Ideally I am looking for cases which provide evidence why there is not a business case for implementation."

Batman1056 I read these two sentences as contradictory - you are wanting to show how ISO 9001, etc. certification benefits businesses?
 
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Sidney Vianna

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Anybody got any reports similar which put forward the business case for 9001/14001/18001? Ideally I am looking for cases which provide evidence why there is not a business case for implementation.
@ (broken link removed) you will find studies that show (or attempt to show) correlation between accredited certification to international management system standards and business performance benefits.
 
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Duke Okes

I doubt you'll find anything that would go beyond anecdotal. Costs will vary significantly based on the gap between what is in place before versus after. Benefits would be very hard to quantify since these standards are for helping organizations avoid failures of quality, safety and environmental issues, and it's hard to quantify what does not occurr.
 
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DRAMMAN

my opinion is that maintaining certification is only worth the cost for a few reasons.

1. You must have a certified management system to do business with your customers. A good example is the automotive industry where you will almost always need to maintain a TS16949 QMS if you are a Tier 1 or 2 supplier.

2. Your organization needs a target like an annual audit to push itself to develop and maintain your QMS.

There are plenty of companies who are not certified and have outstanding quality. Those same companies have well developed quality systems which is how they achieve high quality. High quality does not just happen.

If you are in the situation where your company want to develop an effective QMS you do not need ISO to do so. But ISO9001 is a great starting point. It is not perfect, but it is a great baseline to start your efforts.
 
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