Search the Elsmar Cove!
**Search ALL of Elsmar.com** with DuckDuckGo including content not in the forum - Search results with No ads.

Criteria for print shop - How do you consider the cycle time in a print shop?

#1
Hi everybody
How do you consider the cycle time in a print shop?
The case where a work order is to produce 3000 letter size manuals.
To start, first is the printing, cutting in other machine, folding, in other machine and so on.

The question comes..
Should I count the cycle time for each folder? Or for the total order?
Because I think is difficult to count on each, since are printed five per second.
Other case producing labels in rolls, a work order could be 100,000 labels or more, in this case , the time is measured by roll? Or producing envelopes a similar case.

Please explain, thanks
 
#6
Definition of Cycle Time: The total time from the beginning to the end of your process, as defined by you and your customer. Cycle time includes processtime, during which a unit is acted upon to bring it closer to an output, and delay time, during which a unit of work is spent waiting to take the next action.

From my print shop experience, you can measure the various (sub) process cycle time and when evaluating the total, you'll see where jobs are held, waiting for guillotine for example...
 
#7
Definition of Cycle Time: The total time from the beginning to the end of your process, as defined by you and your customer. Cycle time includes processtime, during which a unit is acted upon to bring it closer to an output, and delay time, during which a unit of work is spent waiting to take the next action.

From my print shop experience, you can measure the various (sub) process cycle time and when evaluating the total, you'll see where jobs are held, waiting for guillotine for example...
Ok, but jobs have to be measured by rolls, packages, let's say 1 roll of 2000 labels or package of 500 manuals, I mean not for every part(one label, one manual)?
Thanks
 
#8
The cycle time is what produces 1 of anything - which is then multiplied by the actual shop order, isn't it? How do your people cost a job if they don't start with 1 of something and then multiply that?
 

Ninja

Looking for Reality
Trusted
#9
Sounds like you have to define for yourself what "categories" are basically similar.
1 roll of 2000 labels through an automated printer would be rather much faster than a pack of 500 manuals.

Consider breaking down the types of products you run (rolls, manuals, cases of free labels, letterhead, etc.) and trying to group them into what is similar and what is not.

When I did VSM for a plant that made two completely different parts, I ended up with 5 VSM's...some subprocesses were just so unique that they couldn't all flow into one.

Adding to Andy's: You have to define one WHAT. Could be label, roll, case...but it does have to come down to "one" of something.
 
#10
Sounds like you have to define for yourself what "categories" are basically similar.
1 roll of 2000 labels through an automated printer would be rather much faster than a pack of 500 manuals.

Consider breaking down the types of products you run (rolls, manuals, cases of free labels, letterhead, etc.) and trying to group them into what is similar and what is not.

When I did VSM for a plant that made two completely different parts, I ended up with 5 VSM's...some subprocesses were just so unique that they couldn't all flow into one.

Adding to Andy's: You have to define one WHAT. Could be label, roll, case...but it does have to come down to "one" of something.
When you say similar, what specific aspects do I have to compare?
And the other issue, regarding time, what is to be considered? Per rolls, per packages?
Not each label nor each manual, or envelope.
Thanks
 


Top Bottom