Defining Nonconformances in a Service Organization

T

thira7

Dear all,

Hi again, in my organization we are trying to explain when we can define something as non conformity. We are a service provider and we provide training to our partners.

Can you please help me with that.

Thank you
 

Jim Wynne

Leader
Admin
Re: Non conformance

Dear all,

Hi again, in my organization we are trying to explain when we can define something as non conformity. We are a service provider and we provide training to our partners.

Can you please help me with that.

Thank you

ISO 9000:2005, which is a normative reference for ISO 9001:2008, defines nonconformity as "Nonfulfillment of a requirement."

In your QMS, there are defined requirements of various types. Anything that happens that fails to satisfy one or more of those requirements is a nonconformity.
 
R

Reg Morrison

Re: Non conformance

ISO 9000:2005, which is a normative reference for ISO 9001:2008, defines nonconformity as "Nonfulfillment of a requirement.
That's correct. The tricky part is the fact that ISO 9000:2005 also defines the term requirement, which includes "generally implied" expectations. For service organizations, these generally implied expectations can be a challenge because, depending on the customer, expectations can vary significantly and "general" are not so easy to establish.

For example, for some people, they expect a huge assortment of snacks and refreshments during the course breaks. Others, would be ok with some cookies, fruit and soda/water/coffee/tea...
 

John Broomfield

Leader
Super Moderator
Re: Non conformance

That's correct. The tricky part is the fact that ISO 9000:2005 also defines the term requirement, which includes "generally implied" expectations. For service organizations, these generally implied expectations can be a challenge because, depending on the customer, expectations can vary significantly and "general" are not so easy to establish.

For example, for some people, they expect a huge assortment of snacks and refreshments during the course breaks. Others, would be ok with some cookies, fruit and soda/water/coffee/tea...

Reg,

But expectations can be managed by service providers.

In your example the organizer could be specific when informing attendees of the snacks and refreshments to be expected.

Not making available decaf and water could however be a nonconformity.

John
 
R

Reg Morrison

I agree that expectations can (and should) be managed....to a certain point.

Anyone attending a public course would (generally) expect that another attendee, sitting close to him/her would not have (foul) body odor.....but it does happen, in rare occasions.

How can the training provider manage that? Tell the attendee with BO to sit in the very back of the classroom? Don't show up? Bring fabreeze to the classroom?

Managing expectations is a good strategy, but, there will be instances where conflicting consumer/customer/expectations can not be fulfilled at once.

What about some of those attendees who want "private consulting" while attending a public class, for example?
 

John Broomfield

Leader
Super Moderator
Dear all,

Hi again, in my organization we are trying to explain when we can define something as non conformity. We are a service provider and we provide training to our partners.

Can you please help me with that.

Thank you

thira7,

Five examples of product nonconformity in your business:

  • Failure to provide students with accurate joining instructions.
  • Failure to provide a venue that is conducive to learning.
  • Instructor lacked the ability to teach.
  • Students not fulfilling their learning objectives.
  • Failing to satisfy student dietary requirements.
Your documented procedure for controlling nonconforming product should limit the impact of the nonconformity on the customer.

It is important not to blame a person but to "blame" the system that caused the nonconformity when discovering and removing the root causes from your system to stop recurrence (aka Corrective Action).

Your NGO Management System either helps employees to understand and fulfill requirements or not.

John
 

John Broomfield

Leader
Super Moderator
I agree that expectations can (and should) be managed....to a certain point.

Anyone attending a public course would (generally) expect that another attendee, sitting close to him/her would not have (foul) body odor.....but it does happen, in rare occasions.

How can the training provider manage that? Tell the attendee with BO to sit in the very back of the classroom? Don't show up? Bring fabreeze to the classroom?

Managing expectations is a good strategy, but, there will be instances where conflicting consumer/customer/expectations can not be fulfilled at once.

What about some of those attendees who want "private consulting" while attending a public class, for example?

Reg,

Classroom specifications are used and improved to avoid all sorts of problems depending on their likelihood or prevalence. Group organization and seating arrangements are usually managed to avoid clashes of personalities but I've not experienced the body odor problem.

Competent instructors manage the private consulting issues all the time without detracting from the learning needs of the class as a whole. Indeed, every participant is invited openly to provide their personal learning objectives at the very beginning. As the instructor records each learning objective on the turn-chart, he or she modifies student expectations.

Despite our best efforts our management system cannot help us to prevent all nonconformity especially when variables remain outside our control. The product nonconformity may be rare or minor enough still to record it but not to invest in corrective action until it becomes one of the "vital few".

John
 
Top Bottom