Search the Elsmar Cove!
**Search ALL of Elsmar.com** with DuckDuckGo including content not in the forum - Search results with No ads.

Deming's SoPK (System of Profound Knowledge) Discussion

R

Rob Nix

But there was some single moment when each sense arrived by itself. Hmmm.

Experience must precede categorization. If you have only one experience you put it in one bucket, one category – which is all you have. As more experiences are, er… um… experienced, then categories are developed to organize them.

It is much like creating an affinity diagram. Numerous ideas (or experiences) are generated without regard to categories, since none have been created yet. In fact, we are told to purposely repress categorization until all “experiences” are generated. THEN we label the categories and place the “experiences” within them. It seems in life that categories are spontaneously developed as experiences dictate the need.

For instance, right now you have just picked a category to place me in. :lol:

But since I know little of Lewis and less of "Mind And The World Order", I should not speak of (or categorize) that which I have not experienced. :rolleyes:
 

WALLACE

Quite Involved in Discussions
A visual overview guide to Deming's 14 points for management

Attached is an overview guide to Deming's 14 points for management, for the convenience of standardized discussions and sharing of views.
There are two types of media attachments available for your convenience: PDF and zip file containing a jpeg.
The information is verbatim form a publication called "Fundamentals of Quality Control and Improvement (Second edition) by Amitava Mitra ISBN 0-13-645086-5
I'll map out overviews of Crosby's and Juran's points as well, if you wish? Maybe someone else with the appropriate software might want to tackle Crosby and Juran interpretations?
Wallace.
 

Attachments

Steve Prevette

Deming Disciple
Staff member
Super Moderator
ddhartma said:
I am currently working my way through Mind and the World Order (only on page 5, so please bear with me)
I managed to purchase an original printing (copyright 1929) of Mind and the World-Order at Powell's Books in Portland OR for $25. Great place for finding odd books by the way. So now I too will try to wade my way through it. There are a bunch of penciled notes in the margins, so it will be interesting to see what the previous owner was thinking . . .
 
Steve Prevette said:
I managed to purchase an original printing (copyright 1929) of Mind and the World-Order at Powell's Books in Portland OR for $25. Great place for finding odd books by the way. So now I too will try to wade my way through it. There are a bunch of penciled notes in the margins, so it will be interesting to see what the previous owner was thinking . . .
I echo your thoughts about Powell's.
The juxtaposition of new and used books makes it a fantastic place.
I went in one morning about 10 am and the next thing I knew, it was 6 pm. Not only did I browse books, I got into conversations and debates with fellow patrons. A great atmosphere!

Good luck on your find, Steve!
 

Steve Prevette

Deming Disciple
Staff member
Super Moderator
2 Chapters In

It's slow going, but I'm 2 chapters into it (Mind and the World Order). I can definitely see the beginnings of two of Dr. Deming's principles - "there is no knowledge without theory" and "the job of management is prediction".

The prediction piece is brought forth with a discussion of a "fountain pen" (yes, you can tell it was written in 1929). The point is that the use of the word "pen" for representing this object also contains a prediction of its use - I will likely intend to write lines on a piece of paper. If instead I called the object a "cylinder", I am predicting I may use it in a geometry lesson. And a baby may think of it as a "toy" or "an object for chewing" as they have not formed the experiences with the object nor are yet able to make the prediction that the object can be used for writing.

:magic:
 
Steve Prevette said:
It's slow going, but I'm 2 chapters into it (Mind and the World Order). I can definitely see the beginnings of two of Dr. Deming's principles - "there is no knowledge without theory" and "the job of management is prediction".

The prediction piece is brought forth with a discussion of a "fountain pen" (yes, you can tell it was written in 1929). The point is that the use of the word "pen" for representing this object also contains a prediction of its use - I will likely intend to write lines on a piece of paper. If instead I called the object a "cylinder", I am predicting I may use it in a geometry lesson. And a baby may think of it as a "toy" or "an object for chewing" as they have not formed the experiences with the object nor are yet able to make the prediction that the object can be used for writing.

:magic:
How interesting that "suddenly" we can see the world through someone else's eyes (Deming, in this case) and say, "Of course! It's so simple!"

Anyone have ideas on how to hone (sharpen) the "predictive mind" so it can manage better? (tools? exercises? slaps upside the head?):confused:
 

Steve Prevette

Deming Disciple
Staff member
Super Moderator
Wes Bucey said:
How interesting that "suddenly" we can see the world through someone else's eyes (Deming, in this case) and say, "Of course! It's so simple!"

Anyone have ideas on how to hone (sharpen) the "predictive mind" so it can manage better? (tools? exercises? slaps upside the head?):confused:
Another great book (which by the way was a much easier read) is The Six Thinking Hats by Edward De Bono. The book categorizes thinking into six types of thinking, each represented by a different color hat. (my word, I find myself incorporating CI Lewis-isms into that sentence). His website gives some periphery information at http://www.edwdebono.com/ but you really need to read the book.

White - logic, pure data
Red - emotion
Black - pessimism, what if negative impacts, precautions
Yellow - optimistic, what if positive impacts, possibilities
Green - creative, out of the box
Blue - integrating, contemplative

"By mentally donning and switching 'Hats' you easily focus or re-direct your thought"
 
Top Bottom