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Definition Deviation - Deviation Request - Definition

Marc

Captain Nice
Staff member
Admin
#1
Deviation - A request by a supplier from the customer to ship substitute or nonconforming product.

A deviation provides before-the-fact approval of a substitute or discrepant part.

Note: A waiver provides after-the-fact approval of a product not built according to the required configuration and specifications.
 
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Q

Quality

#2
Would you consider it a PART deviation or a PRINT deviation? Current debate ensuing within the company on this one.

My vote is for PRINT deviation because you are deviating from the requirements stated on the print. You aren't deviating from the part.
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#3
It doesn't matter. Using Marc's definitions, if you make a part that doesn't meet specifications, and you don't discover the discrepancy until after the parts are made, you're going to ask for a deviation from the customer. If the problem in question doesn't affect the part itself, generally a waiver is involved. For example, the customer might have specified a certain method of shipping or packaging. When it comes time to ship, and you can't do it the way the customer expects, you would ask the customer to waive the requirement.
 
D

dna_leri

#4
It doesn't matter. Using Marc's definitions, if you make a part that doesn't meet specifications, and you don't discover the discrepancy until after the parts are made, you're going to ask for a deviation from the customer. If the problem in question doesn't affect the part itself, generally a waiver is involved. For example, the customer might have specified a certain method of shipping or packaging. When it comes time to ship, and you can't do it the way the customer expects, you would ask the customer to waive the requirement.
Deviation - A request by a supplier from the customer to ship substitute or nonconforming product.

A deviation provides before-the-fact approval of a substitute or discrepant part. A waiver provides after-the-fact approval of a product not built according to the required configuration and specifications.
I am not so sure about the before-the-fact and after-the-fact distinction drawn by Marc and Jim above. To me a deviation or a waiver are essentially the same and can be interchangeably used depending on the customer.

In either case a before-the-fact approval is always preferable.
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#5
The definitions Marc gave are those generally used, but you're right--terminology like this isn't absolute. So long as everyone understands what's going on, it doesn't make much difference.
 
K

kaliko81

#6
From my point of view the right process should be: if you predict that you will not be able to meet a customer requirement (before-the-fact) a deviation is needed. If you don't discover the discrepancy until after the parts are made, it should be documented in a non conformance report and a than a waiver may be requested in order to accept the parts as they are. It may looks like a red tape process but for me, a deviation rquest by one of my supplier tells me that this supplier is in total control of its processes and a waiver request is almost always followed by a corrective action request by me.

Kaliko
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#7
From my point of view the right process should be: if you predict that you will not be able to meet a customer requirement (before-the-fact) a deviation is needed. If you don't discover the discrepancy until after the parts are made, it should be documented in a non conformance report and a than a waiver may be requested in order to accept the parts as they are.
You're using the opposite definitions (from what Marc had posted), but again, that's fine so long as you're consistent with them and everyone understands what you mean.
It may looks like a red tape process but for me, a deviation rquest by one of my supplier tells me that this supplier is in total control of its processes and a waiver request is almost always followed by a corrective action request by me.
You should expect suppliers to give you the CA details as a condition of accepting the discrepant product. You shouldn't have to request it, in other words. On the other hand, for what you're describing as a "waiver" (before the fact) some form of CA might also be in order, depending on the reason for the request.
 

Marc

Captain Nice
Staff member
Admin
#10
I am not so sure about the before-the-fact and after-the-fact distinction drawn by Marc and Jim above. To me a deviation or a waiver are essentially the same and can be interchangeably used depending on the customer.

In either case a before-the-fact approval is always preferable.
My definition is from the automotive industry.
 
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