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Do cut-in ECOs trigger "control of nonconforming product" procedure?

QLearning

Starting to get Involved
#1
Hi All,

First time posting a question. We are developing a cut-in engineering change order procedure, and want to know if the product already assembled per revision prior to change order, but not yet shipped, should be considered "nonconforming product."

Thanks!
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#2
Hi All,

First time posting a question. We are developing a cut-in engineering change order procedure, and want to know if the product already assembled per revision prior to change order, but not yet shipped, should be considered "nonconforming product."

Thanks!
By "cut-in" I assume you're referring to what's often called a "running change," which happens when there is WIP in one condition and finished goods in another?

Your ECO procedure should account for how to deal with existing inventory. It may be scrapped, reworked, used as is, etc. You should also have a process for identifying that material if it's necessary to do so, such that traceability is maintained. Whether or not the material is considered nonconforming depends on the disposition coming from the ECO, and whatever need there might be to keep it segregated.
 
#3
Hi All,

First time posting a question. We are developing a cut-in engineering change order procedure, and want to know if the product already assembled per revision prior to change order, but not yet shipped, should be considered "nonconforming product."

Thanks!
please explain what you mean by "cut-in engineering change order procedure"

I have an idea that the following took place:

While product was "in process," Somebody took a look at the design and said, "We should change this." (referring to some minor or major feature.) Others listened to Somebody and said, "Sounds about right, let's do it."

Then, either the operator working on the process was verbally informed to make the feature change or Somebody made a red line change on the drawing. Thus the product was made to the configuration suggested by Somebody. Another guy then said, "Holy cow! We have to officially change the drawing." Somebody said, "Oh yes. We need to get the suits to sign off on this."

The drawing was changed, the formal Engineering Change Order circulated and approved in writing. Now the product is done and Another guy says, "Holy smoke! We did things out of order. Will we get punished? Should we hide the first piece and pretend like we did everything in order?"
Did I get this about right? If so, relax. What I described is "red line" expediting. Somebody and Another guy probably talked to all the necessary folks about the change before telling the operator to go ahead and make the changes. As an afterthought or just due to the natural inertia of the organization, the formal paperwork is taking some time to catch up to the actual change. To :ca: though, a notation ought to be added to the file indicating the product was made to the "approved" red line change and that the formal ECO took some time to work through the system.

I've written about this situation before here, where changes are made in a design verbally or by email and incorporated before the formal paperwork catches up. Everyone just has to be sure the formal paperwork DOES match the red line "as built" design.
 
#4
Hi All,

First time posting a question. We are developing a cut-in engineering change order procedure, and want to know if the product already assembled per revision prior to change order, but not yet shipped, should be considered "nonconforming product."

Thanks!
If you're classifying it as a "cut-in", then one can assume that the items previously created are acceptable. When the ECO is put into place to deal with the production of a nonconforming part (something that CANNOT be used), cut-ins aren't used - it's changed immediately and is in effect immediately.

As previously mentioned, we're comparing a running change to an immediate, mandatory correction.

Of course, the cut-in may simply be the result of a change in the customer's requirements, which may or may not invalidate previously made product. When that change is to occur is entirely dependent on the decision you and the customer make.
 
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