Documentation Reduction - Over Documented ISO 9001:2000 QMS

U

UV360 - 2006

#1
Hello All,
Does anyone know of a book or article I can use as a reference for the reduction of documentation of an ISO 9001:2000 QMS? My employers QMS is heavily overdocumented, and I'm looking for ways to reduce the amount of documentation without compromising compliance.
Thanks.
 

Coury Ferguson

Moderator here to help
Staff member
Super Moderator
#2
Re: Overdocumented ISO 9001:2000 QMS

Hello All,
Does anyone know of a book or article I can use as a reference for the reduction of documentation of an ISO 9001:2000 QMS? My employers QMS is heavily overdocumented, and I'm looking for ways to reduce the amount of documentation without compromising compliance.
Thanks.
There is no book that would give you the answers (that I am aware of). ISO9001:2000 requires only six (6) procedures minimum but don't only rely on the 6. Review your processes to determine which are critical and document them as well.
 
Last edited:

ScottK

Not out of the crisis
Staff member
Super Moderator
#3
Re: Overdocumented ISO 9001:2000 QMS

Check out ISO 9001:2000 A Practical Quality Manual Explained by Kevin Grimes.

It gives a pretty minimalist approach to the manual/procdures.
I don't necessarily agree with doing it his way in my current company, but if it works for others that's great.
I use it as a reference for developing core procedures.
 

GStough

Staff member
Super Moderator
#4
Re: Overdocumented ISO 9001:2000 QMS

There may also be some articles in quality mags such as Quality Progress (ASQ) on going to a paperless system, streamlining the document control process, etc.

Coury's correct :yes: - a thorough review of your processes may yield opportunities for reducing the current documentation volume.

Good luck!
 
#5
You are wading across the stream to fetch water, my friends. :cool: We have been discussing this in nauseating detail here in the Cove, so look no further (Oh, of course you should look further, but there is a lot of info right here).
Does anyone know of a book or article I can use as a reference for the reduction of documentation of an ISO 9001:2000 QMS?.
My employers QMS is heavily overdocumented, and I'm looking for ways to reduce the amount of documentation without compromising compliance.
Good call. Been there, done that and still doing it. The following links should be useful in that quest:

QMS (Quality Management System) Manual - The Boss Wants a 4 Page Manual - What to Do?
Keeping Procedures Simple
Am I doing to much documentation?
ISO 9001: Avoiding Over Documentation
Simple Quality Systems Manual - Do we really need bloated Quality Manuals
Amount of Documentation dependent on staff competency
Size of QMS / Size of company - What advantages do small, simple organizations have?
Help needed - We have one of these so called "canned systems"

/Claes
 
Q

qualitytrec

#6
I can really relate and if your company is like the one I am in now you have a lot of documentation, but many of the most critcal documents have not even been started or if they are they are inadequatly defined. At least I know I have a job. Just aquestion to further this discussion. When it comes to putting together a QMS can we treat it as a product and use lean techniques? I do not know if this has been discussed before i have not had time to look at everything.
Read the threads Claes posted many of them are very good discussions. Thanks Claes.

Mark
 

RoxaneB

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
#7
Mark, you're question is probably a thread unto itself, but let me ask you this...why wouldn't you implement a management system (be it quality, environment, safety, financial or integrated) using the principles of lean? Does it not make sound business sense to implement a system that is effective and efficient (i.e., minimizes waste)?

The best part is that if developed properly, a management system can be implemented with the principles of lean without actually using the term "lean". If tools and methodologies are introduced properly, then they should be used as a lean environment intends.

If not, however, we find ourselves introducing the concept of lean within our organization and everyone panicks as they think "job cuts" and "reduced hours".
 
#8
Just aquestion to further this discussion. When it comes to putting together a QMS can we treat it as a product and use lean techniques? I do not know if this has been discussed before i
I know that we have, at some point, but I think it's been in connection with the subject of this thread, not as a specific subject.

Anyway, I want to suggest yet another at least slightly related thread: Seeking Tips: Office Improvement - Best Practices

/Claes
 
G

Greg B

#9
We had over 1,500 regulated documents (written within the company) encompassing Safety, Env, Qa , Hr etc etc. I went on a one man mission to reduce the paperwork. 1st step was to have every document reviewed with the following action in mind:

Do we need the document or is it a skill that is learnt
Does their competencies (see above) cover this
Is it written down just for the sake of writing it
Does it have too much information (or not enough)
Is it duplicated in a procedure or form
can it be replaced by a flowchart, form or checklist

After all of this was done, we then started by removing all of those documents that were no longer required. We revamped the document layout and removed all manner of information that was purely there for the sake of the old ISO. Normative references, Scopes etc...We concentrated just on the processes.

We reduced all of our documentation to a more manageable level. Some documents went from 16 pages to 3 or 4. We then placed everything on an electronic document system and this also save dall the hassle of hardcopies. It was the most efficient thing we have done in the QA system.

We just applied the KISS principle and everyone followed.
 

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