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Electronic Work Instructions for the Operators during Assembly Work

K

klape

#1
Hi

I'm working on a concept to implement electronic work instructions for the operators during assembly work.
The work instructions should be displayed on a (touch screen) display as a slideshow (cfr powerpoint style) and the operator must be able to go through the instructions (previous next button) by pushing a button within reach (with hands or feet). Work instructions should be located on a central server location so all workstations can simultaneously access the instructions and changes can be made by the engineers in an easy fashion.
My main question is what am I going to need for this (hardware). I don't want desktop computers at each workstation so I'm thinking about network LCD displays. How can I implement the previous next button in such a scenario? Can this be linked to a MES system? So we can scan a barcode and the appropriate work instruction is displayed.

Thoughts?

Greetings
 
Last edited by a moderator:
#2
Hi

I'm working on a concept to implement electronic work instructions for the operators during assembly work.
The work instructions should be displayed on a (touch screen) display as a slideshow (cfr powerpoint style) and the operator must be able to go through the instructions (previous next button) by pushing a button within reach (with hands or feet). Work instructions should be located on a central server location so all workstations can simultaneously access the instructions and changes can be made by the engineers in an easy fashion.
My main question is what am I going to need for this (hardware). I don't want desktop computers at each workstation so I'm thinking about network LCD displays. How can I implement the previous next button in such a scenario? Can this be linked to a MES system? So we can scan a barcode and the appropriate work instruction is displayed.

Thoughts?

Greetings
It appears as if you intend for one worker or work station to handle a variety of work instructions (like a machining job shop for instance.) Have you given thought to the size screen you'll need? The duration of a job (number of production pieces?) before the worker must change to another set of instructions? How about coordinating tools, tooling, and materials along with instructions for more error proofing?

At one point, in the 90's, my shop had many of these things covered, but I was always frustrated by the limitations of equipment or software available. With the advent of wireless networking and super cheap laptops, many of those frustrations would disappear.

I envision an electronic traveler, confirmed by bar code reading of label attached to material, tooling, and other "things" necessary for producing the product. Depending on the nature of the product, the material, the tooling and production material, I further envision:

  1. raw material delivered to work station with a bar code label
  2. worker uses wireless, handheld bar code reader (they have them in my supermarket to read heavy items in the bottom of the cart!) to trigger his screen with the proper info
  3. further, reading from the screen [probably a touch screen - no keyboard necessary], he determines toolings or settings on machine (also confirmed by bar code or direct input to computer as they are attached to machine or set on work surface)
  4. work on product proceeds
  5. in-process inspection readings by touch or visual readings of cameras directly to computer
  6. finished bar code tag printed at work station for attachment to product (maybe even engraved on product with machine or laser)
 

Pancho

wikineer
Super Moderator
#3
Hi

I'm working on a concept to implement electronic work instructions for the operators during assembly work.
The work instructions should be displayed on a (touch screen) display as a slideshow (cfr powerpoint style) and the operator must be able to go through the instructions (previous next button) by pushing a button within reach (with hands or feet). Work instructions should be located on a central server location so all workstations can simultaneously access the instructions and changes can be made by the engineers in an easy fashion.
My main question is what am I going to need for this (hardware). I don't want desktop computers at each workstation so I'm thinking about network LCD displays. How can I implement the previous next button in such a scenario? Can this be linked to a MES system? So we can scan a barcode and the appropriate work instruction is displayed.

Thoughts?

Greetings
Here are a couple of threads that are relevant to your needs:

Good luck!
Pancho
 
K

klape

#4
It's for a big variety of products (always the same process step but lots of different types). Everything is precise manual labor (so no usage of machines). If we won't consider the barcoding the operator could be selecting the correct work instruction through an easy to use selection menu. We already have highly efficient workstations in place (5S) + storage of raw materials close to point of use. At the moment we are using paper work instructions (several binders but with good pictures and few text (so no questions on the content)) so the operator needs to choose the correct section so he can begin working. Working electronicaly will save us place, easy to change steps or sequence in the work instructions + follow up, time logging,... But the question remains what hardware will we need (except from the 17" or 19" Touch screen displays)

thx for the replies
the display doesn't have to be mobile, just placed right in front of the operator (eg hanging on a wall)
 
Last edited by a moderator:
T

tomvehoski

#5
You could probably do it with a standard PC/Laptop/All-in-one linked to a server and HTML or PDF files. The software and server setup are the more difficult part.

I do question if this will really be a time saver and improvement. Sure it will be easeir to update documentation, but you now have many more workstations to support, additional training for the operators, loss of time if a network goes down or a touchscreen fails, ....
 
K

klape

#6
They must follow the work instruction and sequence and with paper there is no real way to check if they followed the work instruction with operator errors as a result. By using a digital work instruction we can control this.
 
T

tomvehoski

#7
They must follow the work instruction and sequence and with paper there is no real way to check if they followed the work instruction with operator errors as a result. By using a digital work instruction we can control this.
How? Will something physically prevent them from changing the process? I can ignore a computer screen as easily as I can ignore a printed document. I can also check off 20 boxes on a form without actually looking at the 20 items. I can also click "next" 20 times after I already implemented my 10 step modified process.

I obviously don't know your process or challenges, but experience tells me the root cause of work instructions not being followed is not because they are on paper.
 
J

Jaltam

#8
Klape,

I have had great success implementing electronic work instructions as well as traceability. I company I worked with provided the software and hardware which allowed me to set up our standard work instructions my self. If you are interested you can contact me offiline and I can share this information with you.
 
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