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Ethics Question in regard to a Regulatory Authority CAR

LesPiles

Involved In Discussions
#1
Hello,

On August 7, I've had the visit at our plant of a regulatory agency. The inspector saw a product that was not described in procedure bearing its mark so he issued a variation notice and has requested a CAR to be send to him before a month.

The product manager (a senior v-p) was on vacation for 3 weeks, and believe it or not, didn't accessed his emails ...

I first issue a NO SHIPMENT order, we removed the name plate with the mark, send pictures to the regulatory agency.

Meanwhile, the vp has a team of 2 young engineers but they wait the return of their boss to act on anything.

I'm kind a little tired of putting efforts trying to save their as***. They did not seem to take the problem seriously. They create NC and leave me alone with sh ...

I received their plan of action and my point of view is it is unacceptable (less than 2 hours of work planned ...). It would not be a corrective action, but rather a correction according to the language of ISO 9000.

What should I do to you?

If I send to the regulatory agency the CAR filled as is, I will be ashamed and it goes against my ethics (and maybe my reputation !).

Should I let them send their CAR to the agency without sending it through me?

Should I stand firm on my position of rejecting their plan and not sending their CAR?

In addition, I am informed that the vp and the two engineers will be at a customer site next week (the last week they could have to work something smart) to settle something where one of their (look that I’m not telling “our”) product has exploded.


Should I request an extension?

Sometimes I'd like to let them deal with the consequences and give them a lesson ... They risk that the agency will withdrew their permission for us to put their mark on our products.

But as informally, I‘ve always been the one who treated the resolution of their sh**, so I'm afraid that it could be me who will inherit the problems from the highest levels of our organization if I let things go.

What would you do?
 

Jim Wynne

Staff member
Admin
#2
I think you need to proceed with great caution on a number of fronts. If things are actually exploding in the field, there could be much trouble and you could find yourself in the middle of it. Even if the issues aren't that drastic, you will be setting yourself up as a scapegoat if you knowingly let others walk into a mess in hopes of teaching them a lesson. It won't work. The best thing you can do is to make your misgivings known, in writing (an email message will do) and then let whomever it is that has the requisite authority make the actual decision as to how to proceed.
 
#3
I think you need to proceed with great caution on a number of fronts. If things are actually exploding in the field, there could be much trouble and you could find yourself in the middle of it. Even if the issues aren't that drastic, you will be setting yourself up as a scapegoat if you knowingly let others walk into a mess in hopes of teaching them a lesson. It won't work. The best thing you can do is to make your misgivings known, in writing (an email message will do) and then let whomever it is that has the requisite authority make the actual decision as to how to proceed.
Pragmatically, I agree with Jim.

I don't really characterize this as an "ethics" issue so much as a teamwork issue. Your first loyalty is to the organization. If you want to make life a little dicey for the vacationing engineer VP, you could. But why? First ask yourself some questions. I discuss a range of responses in the thread:
Ethics - Moral law vs. Criminal law

This VP and his cringing aides may be slackards or incompetent, but that's no reason to penalize the organization.

If the guy is absent and his aides are afraid to act, simply take the issue to someone higher on the food chain with the comment, "Gee. Mr. X is not answering messages and his aides seem afraid to act without his input. This seems like an issue that should be handled now. I'm not really the owner of the process, but I am aware of the situation. What do YOU think WE should do?"

Once reported to a boss in a neutral, but concerned for the organization manner, YOU will be protected from most fallout because you have acted [seemingly] on behalf of the organization versus seeming to be out to make Mr. X look bad.
 
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