Examples of Material Certificate (CofC or CofA) Document (Records) Control Systems

B

Boater

#1
Hello, I am interested in ways companies control the collection and archiving of material certificates. I am involved in a new company that is requiring all designated purchased materials have either a CofC or CofA available. We have only maintained a small collection of CofA`s in the past that fit in a few binders; the new requirement will result in a much larger collection. So far I am receiving some via e-mail and some as hard copies. Will you share how this is accomplished in your company? Thanks.
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#2
Re: Examples of Certificate Document Control Systems

Hello, I am interested in ways companies control the collection and archiving of material certificates. I am involved in a new company that is requiring all designated purchased materials have either a CofC or CofA available. We have only maintained a small collection of CofA`s in the past that fit in a few binders; the new requirement will result in a much larger collection. So far I am receiving some via e-mail and some as hard copies. Will you share how this is accomplished in your company? Thanks.
If by "CofC" you're referring to a certificate of conformance that states only that the material conforms to the requirements, the supplier has already tacitly "certified" the material by shipping it against your purchase order. In legal terms the certificate doesn't add anything. On the other hand, if "CofA" means "certificate of analysis" and includes actual test results, there can be some value to the purchaser.

How you archive the certificates is a function of how many certificates there are. If there are relatively few, you might just scan them and store them as PDF files. If your suppliers are using various media to send them to you, you should specify a standard format that will facilitate your storage strategy.
 

Caster

An Early Cover
#3
Re: Examples of Certificate Document Control Systems

To add on to what Jim said, COA and COC are not typically value added, costly for your supplier to prepare and for you to store (as you are finding). The data is not in a format suitable for analysis and typically just goes to a file cabinet to eventually get shredded.

May I suggest you contact them and ask if they keep test data on their end. If so, they could send quarterly summaries (SPC, capability) instead of a cert with every shipment.

If you are in a regulated industry that requires COA, COCs (I feel your pain) there are software solutions out there.

You could possibly scan to a pdf and save with a meaningful traceable file name.
 

jkuil

Quite Involved in Discussions
#4
Re: Examples of Certificate Document Control Systems

I have worked for a regulated (medical device) company, which purchase process was not performing very well. In this case, the CoC and CoA were value added, though they better worked on their purchase process.

The CoA and CoC are verified at incomming inspection and are commonly filed with the inspection report.

I have seen electronic versions sent by e-mail, with a picture (scanned copy) of a signature in the file. The date in the file was determined by the print date. A very doubtfull practice by the supplier, as these certificates may be considered unauthorised, which makes them unvaluable. So, besides auditing the producttesting by the spupplier, their certification practice must be audited as well, before incomming products may be accepted merely on their certificates.
 
J

jequihua

#5
Re: Examples of Certificate Document Control Systems

Hi,

I recommend you to define which components are required to keep supplier's C of Cs. Otherwise, you will be piling a lot of documents on your file cabinets. Nowadays, there are softwares that can be used for file storage. If you are on a FDA regulated company, you will need to validate the software for record retention purposes.

Look for specific requirement that you need to provide as evidence. For example, if your company is manufacturing of an electronic device, you may need to maintain records to prove that the component meets the requirements for safety (UL, CSA, ETL, etc).

I hope this helps,

Jorge Equihua
 

somashekar

Staff member
Super Moderator
#6
Hello, I am interested in ways companies control the collection and archiving of material certificates. I am involved in a new company that is requiring all designated purchased materials have either a CofC or CofA available. We have only maintained a small collection of CofA`s in the past that fit in a few binders; the new requirement will result in a much larger collection. So far I am receiving some via e-mail and some as hard copies. Will you share how this is accomplished in your company? Thanks.
Every material that comes into our plant gets a unique store lot number. We ask suppliers for CofC or the CofA for those parts where we do not have inspection capability. Our erp has the facility to upload documents, and we scan and upload these as a part of the material acceptance activity done by QA.
 


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