Exercise and Anger Management

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Charmed

#1
Dear All:

The following provides the link to an article I found to be very interesting. It talks about the adverse effects of "blowing your top off" on your health. Studies seem to show a strong correlation between anger and hostility and the risk of suffering a heart attack and heart disease in general.

http://cholesterolmatters.msn.com/article.aspx?aid=11

Doctors know how to approach high cholesterol, high blood pressure and other traditional risk factors, but when it comes to dealing with anger and hostility there is no ready answer, Eaker says.

"The question is, 'What can we do about it?'" Eaker says.

But there is little research on whether anger management can prevent a heart attack in people who do not yet have heart disease. Interestingly, exercising seems to be a good way to manage anger.

"My advice to people who experience anger and hostility frequently and intensely is to begin to identify triggers of their anger and to learn better ways of coping with those situations," says Williams. "Neither full-blown anger nor festering anger is healthy."

One way to let off steam, according to Milani, is to exercise. The New Orleans physician compares hostility to water running down a mountain: If it doesn't find an outlet, it will make its own path.

"Exercise is its own path," Milani says. Hostility may be "blunted" by the release provided by physical activity, he notes.

Finally, here's another interesting quote.

"It is regrettable that there are so few studies examining the relationship of anger and heart-disease risk among women," Williams says. "This is changing, however." She points out that in a recent large study she and her colleagues did not find any gender differences in the impact of anger on heart-disease risk.

In other words men may be from Mars and women from Venus but in blowing their tops off, everyone is the same - I mean when it come to being right here on Earth. :rolleyes:

Charmed
 
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R

ralphsulser

#2
I can tell you from personal experience that I have vowed never to get real angry again. Last year I discovered my gold signet ring was missing from my tray on top my dresser. I bought this in 1989 and wore it daily untill a couple years ago due to the work environment here. So only wore it occasionally since then. Anyhow, I wanted to wear it and it was missing, I looked high and low to no avail. Then I remembered we had a couple workman in to do some plumbing in the bathroom near the dresser. Anyhow by then my blood was starting to boil, and I got real angry, and blew my top. Then, I felt like my chest and heart were going to burst, and had a terrible headache. Well, I tried to calm down real soon after that. Real scary experience. Not going to go thru that again no matter what happens, will maintain my cool to avoid getting that angry, and go walk it off.
 
C

Charmed

#3
Never really helps

ralphsulser said:
...... Then I remembered we had a couple workman in to do some plumbing in the bathroom near the dresser. Anyhow by then my blood was starting to boil, and I got real angry, and blew my top. ..... Real scary experience. Not going to go thru that again no matter what happens, will maintain my cool to avoid getting that angry, and go walk it off.
Dear ralphsulser

I can tell you when things similar to what you describe here happen, invariably the thief (if at all) is never who we think it is. I remember jumping to quick conclusions about such things and it was often wrong. I can't remember blowing my top off for such things but I have on other occasions for totally different reasons.

The bottom line is that blowing your top off never really helps.

Charmed
 
C

Carl Keller

#4
I can tell you when something happens that would normally make me angry, I calmly and cooly investigate, rationalize, come to a conclusion and then.....

In a controlled, focused manner, beat the living he** out of the perpatrator, but hey we all deal with things in a different way.

Stay healthy folks, getting angry can cause you to get hurt in a fight.

Carl-
 
#5
This thread should prove interesting.

Yeah. I try to avoid blowing my top too. Whenever it happens (very, very seldom) the same pattern invariably repeats itself.
  • I stop using my brains, with predictable results :rolleyes: .
  • Just like Ralph described, I get a terrible headache, no doubt due to a suddenly much to high blood pressure.
  • Afterwards I feel ridicilous. Now, why did I do/say that?
  • I need to apologize to people I had no business or wish to offend.
Fortunately I seem to emit very clear warning signals when I get close to losing my temper, and most people take notice and back down... Just like anyone I do get angry now and then, but that's different. I can get angry and still remain rational. If I blow my top, reason goes out the window, and I hate that.

As for exercise: Absolutley. It's a good way to redirect anger, and after a good workout I don't have the energy to throw a tantrum.

/Claes
 
C

Charmed

#6
Claes Gefvenberg said:
Yeah. ....
As for exercise: Absolutley. It's a good way to redirect anger, and after a good workout I don't have the energy to throw a tantrum.
/Claes
Dear Claes:

As for exercise......,

That's the whole point. I called attention to this article since this is the first one, as far as I can tell, where exercise is being suggested as a method of redirecting "energy" that can be used to throw a tantrum. They also say exercise is good for your, you know what, ...life. That's two winners!

Charmed
 
W

wolfnature

#7
Just had to chime with my 2 cents and say that video games are a great release as well. After a bad day at work there's nothing quite like going home and blowing things up in a game :biglaugh:

I don't think it's as important what you do, as long as you have some sort of release.
 

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