Search the Elsmar Cove!
**Search ALL of Elsmar.com** with DuckDuckGo including content not in the forum - Search results with No ads.

Experiences as a female auditor / auditee

SpinDr99

Involved In Discussions
#21
I received Lead Auditor certifications for ISO-9000, QS-9000 and ISO-14000 in the mid 90's and again for ISO-9000:2000, so I've been doing first and second party audits for some time. I've been thinking of working for a CB, but when I see the travel schedule and the hours that my current CB auditor puts in (through e-mails I receive at 2 or 3AM), I wonder about having a personal life. Maybe some of you could share working out the work/life balance with me? I'm transitioning my current employer to 2015, and don't see them dropping a dime for Lead Auditor certification for myself. I spoke with one CB and they were talking about the work week running from Sunday night to Friday night. How do you maintain any semblance of a personal life?
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Staff member
Admin
#22
@Jen Kirley Thank you for your post. Great information. Are there any other websites, blogs, books, any sources for additional information on becoming a Lead Auditor that you can recommend? Thanks. -Dawn
If you have not yet passed an accredited Lead Auditor course for the standard you will be working with, sign up for a class at once.

The ASQ Certified Auditor Handbook is worth buying. ISO 9001:2015 In Plain English is also very good. Craig Cochran's book about auditing to ISO 9001:2015 is also good for newbies.

Also read the IAF guidance documents for CB auditors here.

Affiliations: I am an ASQ member. Craig Cochran is a long-time Cover.
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Staff member
Admin
#23
I received Lead Auditor certifications for ISO-9000, QS-9000 and ISO-14000 in the mid 90's and again for ISO-9000:2000, so I've been doing first and second party audits for some time. I've been thinking of working for a CB, but when I see the travel schedule and the hours that my current CB auditor puts in (through e-mails I receive at 2 or 3AM), I wonder about having a personal life. Maybe some of you could share working out the work/life balance with me? I'm transitioning my current employer to 2015, and don't see them dropping a dime for Lead Auditor certification for myself. I spoke with one CB and they were talking about the work week running from Sunday night to Friday night. How do you maintain any semblance of a personal life?
I expect you will need more current Lead Auditor training. If you are serious about this, sign up for training at once. CBs generally expect candidates to come with this training already accomplished.

I have no personal life. None. I am "on the road" 4 weeks out of 5, which is an improvement over last year when I was out 5 weeks out of 6. I get adequate sleep during the week if I try hard, and catch up on weekends.

This is hard on my husband, who says he is lonely. Our children are grown, otherwise this profession would not work at all. If there was sufficient employment for someone like me in my area, I would seriously consider applying for it though I am not sure I am any longer a good fit for corporate life.

Many times the CB auditor is contract, not an employee. As such, based on the CB we are usually able to accept or decline assignments, and "block off" portions of our calendars (I have to do so a year in advance) so as to ensure enough time at home while still earning enough to pay the bills.

I am an LLC, and an S-corporation for tax purposes. This means I have to pay an accountant for financial services, but there are a great many tax savings that more than offset the expenses.

I hope this helps!
 

Randy

Super Moderator
#24
I received Lead Auditor certifications for ISO-9000, QS-9000 and ISO-14000 in the mid 90's and again for ISO-9000:2000, so I've been doing first and second party audits for some time. I've been thinking of working for a CB, but when I see the travel schedule and the hours that my current CB auditor puts in (through e-mails I receive at 2 or 3AM), I wonder about having a personal life. Maybe some of you could share working out the work/life balance with me? I'm transitioning my current employer to 2015, and don't see them dropping a dime for Lead Auditor certification for myself. I spoke with one CB and they were talking about the work week running from Sunday night to Friday night. How do you maintain any semblance of a personal life?
As with anything else, you do what you must. I've been doing it for 16 years now and you learn how to juggle around everything.

Like Jen, I work under contract now (I was also full time a few years back). I'm fortunate in that I get as much work as I want and am offered more than I can do so annually hitting "6" figures is fairly assurred.

You can't straddle a fence wishing and hoping, you've gotta jump and do it because if you're wishy-washy nothing will happen other than frustration.
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Staff member
Admin
#25
Are there any other websites, blogs, books, any sources for additional information on becoming a Lead Auditor that you can recommend? Thanks. -Dawn
None that I know of, besides of course American Society for Quality CQA certification. ASQ's Handbook has good information that applies to the 3rd party audit process.

Registrars will describe their requirements, usually certifications in hand and preferably industry experience. What they don't list on their web-based Help Wanted ads can be learned from the person who responds to resume submission.

Although most registrars want their auditors to bring full qualifications, this is, however a good time to join as some CBs are shorthanded. For certain standards, a few may even be willing to sponsor the candidate's qualification.
 
#27
I'm not an auditor but a consumer of auditors. To me it seems important to develop your own local client base as much as possible. This keeps you at home more often. We worked with one who would audit the week before thanksgiving. That way she was home before and after the holiday and still made a few bucks. Auditors are not really different than attorneys or accountants. The person is more important than the firm.
 
#28
I'm not an auditor but a consumer of auditors. To me it seems important to develop your own local client base as much as possible. This keeps you at home more often. We worked with one who would audit the week before thanksgiving. That way she was home before and after the holiday and still made a few bucks. Auditors are not really different than attorneys or accountants. The person is more important than the firm.
Good luck with that! From more than 8 (recent years) dealing with auditors and their clients, if you are a 1099, you'd better have a second income source if you want to be home most nights. Relying on "local" work that fits your elected NAICS/SIC codes and allows sufficient income is a practical impossibility in my experience (without a side gig).
 
Top Bottom