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Getting Mgmt support after registration

S

Steven Sulkin

#1
In Joe_1's posting "Wrestling the Bull By the Horns," we discussed how to get management support for QS after registration. In order to continue the discussion efficiently I would like to summarize and start a new thread....

In order to get management support after QS, you need to justify adding resources to your quality projects by explaining the value to the company of getting compliant (value above the paper certificate). The value should be clear whether your doing a corrective action, an audit, SPC, or an improvement team. Show them D money.

Andy Bassett asked, "have you been able to prove clear, positive results?"

Yes, here is an example.....
I commissioned one of my inspectors to take on calibration and improve it. She changed the schedule so that it could be brought in-house saving about $10K/annual; took unused tools out of circulation (value unknown), and purchased a master standard allowing us to reduce calibration cost another $1K/annual. She also added more calibration services. This took place in a three month period. Not too bad eh?

My other inspector was tasked with lowering cost of quality through in-process inspection. She evaluated our FMEA's and determined her best time would be spent improving our reaction plans. Once complete, she will re-evaluate our defect rate to verify effectiveness.

The trick is to start small and build a reputation with your operations folks. Make life easier for a supervisor, save a few bucks for the manager.

In terms of measuring clear results. Use PDSA and dont worry so much. Notice that I didnt translate everthing into money. Its obvious from my report that the inspector made significant improvements. No need to do a multiple comparision to figure that out. As a matter of fact, my most popular tool for verifying a PDSA is the original control chart (just look for a positive, significant shift).

Comments?
 
L

Laura M

#2
Originally posted by Steven Sulkin:

The trick is to start small and build a reputation with your operations folks. Make life easier for a supervisor, save a few bucks for the manager.


[/B]
Excellent advice. Ironic how the calibration example lines up with lean manufacturing concepts too. Once operations folks know what needs to be done, they can see the benefit and have the power to do it.
Even tho alot of folks see the ISO/QS exercise as alot of "extra"...it can be used to commonize, consolidate and eliminate waste as well.
 
S

Steven Sulkin

#3
I have some more ideas that may also make your life a little easier...

1- Recruit internal auditors from various levels and areas of the company. I believe this works very well. Suddenly you have 10 change agents you can train to explain the value of the quality systems and requirements.

Another one...I publish a newsletter. In it I have several columns dedicated to explaining the value of quality to the company. The Elements Explained column targets a specific QS9K requirement and I explain in my own words how it adds value to my company. I also have an Auditor's Notes section. This section highlights positive observations noted in internal audits. I asked my auditors to focus especially on mistake proofing solutions right now. I have various other articles highlighting quality initiatives. For example, I have an article on supplier audits, why we do them and what we look for in a supplier.

I said in a previous post to make some quick fixes to win support of supervisors and managers, here are some ideas on how to find these first fixes....

When you hire the consultant to do a first assessment, write up real corrective actions based on his/her input. Improve those processes and show off like hell (see newsletter idea).

Mistake proofing can sometimes be an easy first fix. Do you have a machine that must operate within certain operating parameters? Buy a light and buzzer to notify you when there is a problem. Do you operate an oven? Add a light to tell you when its done.

Do you have problems with inspection, control of nonconforming product, ID and traceability? Do you collect a LOT of process data? Chances are you have entropy in your inspection system. Go to back to your control plan and eliminate the unnecessary or outdated inspections. Sometimes too much inspection and paperwork can make things worse!

Hmmm... How about parallel processing? If you have two operations in sequence, can they be done simulateneously. We redesigned a workcell and significantly improved cycletime by having one operator run two machines at once (one does the front, the other the back).

Training is a biggie! Especially in areas where there is a lot of turnover. Heck, sometimes the lack of training is the CAUSE of turnover. If you have a problem and you do training to fix it, consider adding the training to your qualification and on the job training for new folks.

Ahhh! One more.....

Dont implement a big quality initiative (e.g. SPC), unless you know what you are doing and you have the support to implement. Your reputation is all you have. Consider hiring an experienced quality engineer or have a consultant that you dont mind moving in with you (not recommended, not only is it expensive, but consultants and fish tend to smell after three days ;) ) and getting his/her feet dirty. Remember, start small until you build the evidence that the thing really works.

Wow! This is really good coffee!

-Steve.

[This message has been edited by Steven Sulkin (edited 17 February 2000).]
 

Marc

Captain Nice
Staff member
Admin
#4
Originally posted by Steven Sulkin:

Consider hiring an experienced quality engineer or have a consultant that you dont mind moving in with you (not recommended, not only is it expensive, but consultants and fish tend to smell after three days ;) ) and getting his/her feet dirty.
There are, as you know, 'good' consultants and 'bad' consultants. There are good and bad plumbers and doctors, for that matter).

Consultants are like piano teachers. They can help you avoid the pitfalls and problems. You can learn to play the piano alone, but in almost every case a 'good' piano teacher will get you 'there' faster and with fewer problems. Expensive? Sometimes very. On the other hand, I seldom hear how much a consultant saved a company in the long run and secondly (from a consultant's point of view) I seldom hear about the 'bad' companies out there. I've seen some real interesting companies and have, in fact, turned jobs down when it was obvious the company was a 'dud'. They screw up and blame the consultant.
 
L

Laura M

#5
Originally posted by Steven Sulkin:

I have some more ideas that may also make your life a little easier...

1- Recruit internal auditors from various levels and areas of the company. I believe this works very well. Suddenly you have 10 change agents you can train to explain the value of the quality systems and requirements.

Another one...I publish a newsletter. In it I have several columns dedicated to explaining the value of quality to the company. The Elements Explained column targets a specific QS9K requirement and I explain in my own words how it adds value to my company. I also have an Auditor's Notes section. This section highlights positive observations noted in internal audits. I asked my auditors to focus especially on mistake proofing solutions right now. I have various other articles highlighting quality initiatives. For example, I have an article on supplier audits, why we do them and what we look for in a supplier.
Steve...I could have written the same stuff!! The newsletter things worked great for me. We also publish monthly & YTD quality data...PR/R's, PPM's etc in the newsletter. Really got the folks in the high PPM areas to get on their management so they wouldn't keep getting the negative publicity. (I know...should have been the other way around!) Great ideas....keep up the informative postings.

Laura (Go Buckeyes!)


[This message has been edited by Marc Smith (edited 17 February 2000).]
 

Marc

Captain Nice
Staff member
Admin
#6
Laura, I put in the end BOLD and end QUOTE code - I think you erased them by mistake.

Steve has some real good ideas. Communication is a large part of where it's at, so to speak and the other issues he mentioned, like review of dqaata and revisiting control plans and such, are also good areas to look at.
 


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