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Happy Independence day America

WALLACE

Quite Involved in Discussions
#1
A sincere and Happy Independence day to all true Americans.
As an expatriot Scot living in Canada, I understand the significance and value of Freedom. Long may you have it America.

A side bar to the declaration of independence.
I understand the Declaration of Arbroath, the most important national document to and for the Scottish psyche and identity, to have influenced the compilation of the American declaration of Independence.
see; http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/scottishhistory/independence/features_independence_arbroath.shtml
I'll be looking out for those fireworks, as I can see them coming from the Niagara Falls area from my location.
Wallace.
 
C

Craig H.

#2
WALLACE said:
A sincere and Happy Independence day to all true Americans.
As an expatriot Scot living in Canada, I understand the significance and value of Freedom. Long may you have it America.

A side bar to the declaration of independence.
I understand the Declaration of Arbroath, the most important national document to and for the Scottish psyche and identity, to have influenced the compilation of the American declaration of Independence.
see; http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/scottishhistory/independence/features_independence_arbroath.shtml
I'll be looking out for those fireworks, as I can see them coming from the Niagara Falls area from my location.
Wallace.

Thanks, Wallace!!

This is the first I have heard of the Declaration of Arbroath. From the quote in the link, it sure does sound like it must have influenced our Declaration some 400+ years later. I'll have to see if I can find the full text.
 

Joe Cruse

Mopar or No Car
#3
After buying the book "1776" a few weeks ago ( a new release, I believe), I have started reading more on the revolution of the British colonies in America and the birth of the USA. There is a ton of stuff to read, and it's pretty interesting, so far. It's amazing how much our public schools gloss over the subject, even in the upper level classes in high school.
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#4
Joe Cruse said:
After buying the book "1776" a few weeks ago ( a new release, I believe), I have started reading more on the revolution of the British colonies in America and the birth of the USA. There is a ton of stuff to read, and it's pretty interesting, so far. It's amazing how much our public schools gloss over the subject, even in the upper level classes in high school.
Not only is it glossed over, sometimes what is taught is wrong. When I was in grade school in the late 1950s it was commonly taught that Christopher Columbus was considered a crank because he believed the earth to be round, and that many people, including his own crewmen, were afraid he'd sail over the edge. But the roundness of the earth had been established long before, by the ancient Greeks starting with Pythagoras. In about 220 BC, Erastothenes calculated the diameter of the earth to withing about 50 miles of the actual value. Fact is, the shape of the earth wasn't a subject of controversy in the 15th century. But sometime in the 1940s, it appears, the Columbus flat-earth myth started appearing in text books, and lingered for the next 20-30 years.
 

Joe Cruse

Mopar or No Car
#5
Yes, and it was still being taught in the late '60's to early '70's.

I'm just getting to some stuff on Benedict Arnold. All I remember being taught of him is that he was a very bad person and a traitor, and nothing about his early work with the resistance.

I hope it has improved, because public school treatment of world and US history in my youth (60's-70's in the US) was NOT exemplary :nope:
 
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