Have you tried Microsoft Windows 8?

bobdoering

Stop X-bar/R Madness!!
Trusted Information Resource
I have a Windows 8 phone, and the technology of Windows 8 was best suited for touch-screen applications. Without that, there is little benefit (and probably more agitation) over W7 or XP. The biggest pain - as usual (although I do not have that issue with my phone) is legacy programs - the ones that work great, but either there are no new versions, or the new versions were "fixed" so much they don't work worth a darn. And...of course...hardware incompatibilities that crop up with new OS.
 
M

MIREGMGR

Microsoft thinks, I guess, that the future of personal computational platforms is to be as smartphone/tablet-like as possible. So, they've provided an OS that does that.

By and large, though, smartphones and tablets are primarily used for content consumption, not for content creation.

Personally, I'm a fairly intensive content creator. I do a lot of writing and information manipulation. I don't use a tablet, and while I use my smartphone a lot, I don't use it for content creation. For that, if I'm away from a desktop, my smartphone is just a modem and I'm on my ultrabook.

My perspective is that an OS is just a productivity tool. It has to fit my working needs...not the other way around. From that perspective, W8 is useless to me. It would force me to unlearn thirty years of work techniques and learn to be a content creator in a smartphone/tablet environment. Ugh.

I'm quite comfortable with W7. I'll just stick with it.
 
My perspective is that an OS is just a productivity tool. It has to fit my working needs...not the other way around.
You echo my thoughts... :agree1: ...and I most certainly do not want to do any more free beta testing for Microsoft. I'll leave that to the eager ones, and then come trundling along in time for service pack I... or maybe II.

/Claes
 

Michael_M

Trusted Information Resource
I bought a Samsung 500T tablet on Wednesday (since I refuse to go anywhere near crowds on Friday).

Getting use to Windows 8 is/was like jumping from Windows 3.11 to Windows 95, a fairly major change to the operating system. I did this for several reasons:

1. My laptop needed replaced about 4 months ago and I have been waiting till Windows 8 Professional was released to get a tablet (smaller, more portable).
2. I am the default tech support for most people I know. I want to know how to use the different software's and operating systems.
3. I am a geek, I want the latest and greatest.
4. I am a nerd, I want to know how to use the latest and greatest.
 

Jim Wynne

Leader
Admin
Microsoft thinks, I guess, that the future of personal computational platforms is to be as smartphone/tablet-like as possible. So, they've provided an OS that does that.

By and large, though, smartphones and tablets are primarily used for content consumption, not for content creation.

Personally, I'm a fairly intensive content creator. I do a lot of writing and information manipulation. I don't use a tablet, and while I use my smartphone a lot, I don't use it for content creation. For that, if I'm away from a desktop, my smartphone is just a modem and I'm on my ultrabook.

My perspective is that an OS is just a productivity tool. It has to fit my working needs...not the other way around. From that perspective, W8 is useless to me. It would force me to unlearn thirty years of work techniques and learn to be a content creator in a smartphone/tablet environment. Ugh.

I'm quite comfortable with W7. I'll just stick with it.

I agree completely. Had I not been faced with a new PC with no OS, I never would have switched to 8. Given the bargain price of $40, I figured I'd go ahead and do it. I can't say that I regret it, but I am a bit dismayed at how touch-oriented the damned thing is.
 

Jim Wynne

Leader
Admin
Another irksome thing is that there doesn't seem to be a way to move "libraries" (documents, pictures, etc.) to a separate partition or drive. I don't know if it was possible in 7, but it was in XP and Vista. I like to keep those things away from the OS partition. Not only do they seem to be stuck on the OS partition, there are also shadow copies of everything that I don't want or need that just take up a lot of space.
 

Jim Wynne

Leader
Admin
After having some time now to get used Windows 8, it's starting to grow on me. Now that I've become reasonably comfortable with finding my way around, I feel better about it than I did at the outset. I expect that there'll be many people who don't have my patience who'll be completely frustrated when faced with a new PC that comes with 8 installed, and that's going to make for a lot of trouble for MS. I'm also sure, as I suggested earlier, that most businesses will want nothing to do with it, being that users will have to be completely retrained on basic OS usage. I suspect that some form of an "enterprise" version will need to be developed.
 

Jim Wynne

Leader
Admin
Now, with about six weeks or so of using Windows 8, I've become pretty comfortable with it. Aside from a few irritating "features," I like it. I found a nice little add-on from Stardock called Start8 that allows for adding a Windows 7-like Start button (and menus) to the Windows 8 desktop. It's very lean on resource usage and is very customizable. Among other facilities, it allows for booting directly to the desktop and not the new Windows 8 Start screen. ETA: Start8 is can be tried for 30 days free of charge, but the cost for it is only US$4.99.

The new Task Manager in Windows 8 is a vast improvement over its predecessors. I had been using Process Hacker as a Task Manager replacement for a long time, but no more. There's a pretty good rundown of Windows 8 improvements here.

I've seen absolutely no stability issues with the OS; it's been rock-steady since day one. The word on the street is that Microsoft is going to a much more frequent major update schedule for Windows, along the lines of what Apple has done with OS X. It appears that the first update might be as soon as this summer, with some speculation as to whether it'll be referred to as Windows 9, Windows 8.x or Windows Blue, which is apparently its codename at this point.
 
Last edited:

bobdoering

Stop X-bar/R Madness!!
Trusted Information Resource
I have become comfortable with the W8 on my phone. Took a while to find some of the secret commands to delete or close things (because there was virtually no documentation on the OS), but beyond that it has more utility than I expected. It is terribly touch driven - so not sure how it translates to a desktop of laptop without touch. I just LOVE Shazam!
 
Top Bottom