History of Quality Control

Any comments gratefully received!
Good job :agree1:

Some comments:
  • Your reference to Darwin is a good angle I had not thought about before, and I think it is a good idea to point out that QA in fact seems to be as old as man.
  • That Egypian rule that "failure to bring their cubits back (for calibration) was punishable by death" sounds interesting, and perhaps worth trying here... :notme:
  • When it comes to statistical methods I would like to suggest a reference to... none other than Sir Isaac Newton: As Warden of the Mint in London, he used statistical methods to assure that the coins held the correct weight. I'm afraid I cannot remember where I read it, but still...
/Claes
 
T

tyker

I've only had time to give the article a quick scan this morning but it looks a very thorough job, Paul. I'll read it more thoroughly over the weekend.

That bit about Deming helping to transform Ford into a profitable car maker seems a bit ironic given recent performance. Maybe an article about the history of the lack of quality could be a future project.
 
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Maybe an article about the history of the lack of quality could be a future project.
There's an idea... Quality bloopers throughout history. I somehow get the feeling that a mere article would not suffice, though: It would probably be more like an encyclopedia... And a big one, at that. :read:

/Claes
 

Paul Simpson

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  • When it comes to statistical methods I would like to suggest a reference to... none other than Sir Isaac Newton: As Warden of the Mint in London, he used statistical methods to assure that the coins held the correct weight. I'm afraid I cannot remember where I read it, but still...
/Claes

Thanks, Claes. Great lead to Isaac Newton. Next draft will have the following passage:

Another individual credited for optical and physics research but not renowned for quality control was Sir Isaac Newton. He became Master of the Mint in 1699. Around this time there were huge problems with counterfeiting and control of the quality of coin. One practice was for so called “clippers” to trim the edges of coins to melt down the clippings for sale while still passing on the coins as whole. To counter this under Newton’s leadership the mill introduced milling on coin edges and engraving in the milled edges of "Ducus et tutamen," Latin for "An ornament and a safeguard." This would enable recipients to tell if someone had clipped the edges. One of the hardest tasks at the Mint was controlling the quality of the coins. Each had to have the same weight and composition. Newton developed special ladles for taking molten metal samples to his office for testing.
 

Paul Simpson

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I learned this one in a Strategic Planning training session about 10 years ago. See the 3rd paragraph of Chapter VI The Unity of the Social Process, in The New State, written by Mary Parker Follett in 1918. The presenter put forth the suggestion that this was the first documented introduction of the the Plan, Do, Check, Act cycle and the grand idea of continual improvement. Mary Parker Follett Website.

Icy, I found a load of stuff about Mary Parker Follett and leadership (outside the scope of my article really) but nothing about PDCA - any other leads?
 

BradM

Leader
Admin
Nice work, Paul. It's a lot of work doing writing like this.

You know, if we really wanted to... we could go back to Genesis for the first example of quality. Cain gave fruits, and Abel gave of the first-born of the flock. Favor was found with Abel, and not with Cain. Isn't that quality in it's simplicity?

Of course, look what it got Abel!:mg:
 

Paul Simpson

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Nice work, Paul. It's a lot of work doing writing like this.

You know, if we really wanted to... we could go back to Genesis for the first example of quality. Cain gave fruits, and Abel gave of the first-born of the flock. Favor was found with Abel, and not with Cain. Isn't that quality in it's simplicity?

Of course, look what it got Abel!:mg:

V. true. Some (female) friends of mine would also say that Adam & Eve was the first example of corrective action:
  • Adam was, of course, non-conforming product ....
  • Eve was a case of right second time!
:lol:
 

Paul Simpson

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In case anyone wants to see where this article will go. The following link to the CQI will show where it fits in.

Expected to be live in April (my guess is May).
 
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