Honda Racing F1 Team takes environmental pole position

Sidney Vianna

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https://www.hondaracingf1.com/loband/news.php

Tough environmental management certification achieved at team’s Brackley HQ.
The Honda Racing F1 Team today announced that it has achieved ISO14001 certification for its UK headquarters at Brackley, Northamptonshire. It is the first time that the ISO14001 accreditation has been granted specifically to a Formula One team and as an integral part of its earthdreams programme, it demonstrates the team’s commitment to taking specific action on environmental issues.
ISO14001 is the international specification for an environmental management system (EMS). Accreditation to ISO14001 proves the Honda Racing F1 Team’s systems conform to the internationally comparable audit standard, and that the team has effectively implemented its environmental management system. Nick Fry, Chief Executive Officer of the Honda Racing F1 Team said of the accreditation:
“Obtaining ISO14001 certification is not an easy thing for a Formula One team to achieve. However our earthdreams initiative is at the core of our team culture and it is important that we, like our project partners, strive to do our best to minimise our impact on the environment in the course of our business. This is a step along the way and there are many areas where we can continue to improve but it’s very pleasing that our efforts have been rewarded by the respected ISO standard and that we met its tough criteria at our first attempt. We are showing that running a business that is as highly pressured as Formula One and doing the right thing are entirely complementary.”
Work towards ISO14001 began in 2005 with management training initiatives on environmental issues. The team is now working on specific targets to reduce its CO2 emissions and will report progress on its website HondaRacingF1.com. Nick Fry continued:
“Contrary to popular belief, the fuel that we use to race and test our cars forms around only 1% of our CO2 emissions footprint. The vast majority is from power use at our factory and air transportation of people and equipment around the world. This gives us some formidable challenges to reduce our consumption but we intend to see the same technology and ingenuity that we deploy on our F1 car to make a worthwhile contribution to reducing our CO2 emissions.”
The team’s commitment to environmental issues is now embodied in earthdreams, a global network of projects that are committed to generating a positive impact. earthdreams currently supports eight environmental projects addressing mobility, technology, sustainability and learning. The number of projects will continue to rise as the team’s environmental council thoroughly evaluates the many worthy applicants that wish to be associated with the earthdreams initiative.
Parent company Honda has a strong track record of leading the way in reducing global CO2 emissions. The 1972 Honda Civic was the first car to pass California’s Clean Air Act and the 2008 Honda FCX Clarity is the world’s first mass-produced zero-emission hydrogen fuel cell car. Today, 85% of every Honda car is recyclable.
The inspection and accreditation process was carried out by the SGS Group and was a success first time round. Pauline Earl, Managing Director, SGS United Kingdom Ltd said: “The Honda Racing F1 Team has shown clearly how certification to ISO14001 can form an important part of its business and marketing strategy. In order to gain this prestigious certification the team has made great strides to improve its environmental impact, demonstrating their commitment to develop a sustainable business practice.”
 

Sidney Vianna

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It seems that Honda is about to announce it's departure from F1. The first F1 casualty of the global economic crisis....
 
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Craig H.

I guess that would be a clean break, then?

Seriously, I am sad to see them leave.
 
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MIREGMGR

NASCAR is going to take big hits as well. I just heard a live radio interview with Jim Press of Chrysler in which he discussed the pressure the Detroit 3 are under regarding their marketing and community expenses, like racing support and charitable contributions.

Maybe karma will do its job, and all the southern NASCAR fans will choose to blame the southern Senatorial coterie...Richard Shelby et al...for that particular bit of damage to one of their favorite parts of the American cultural scene.
 
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Craig H.

NASCAR is going to take big hits as well. I just heard a live radio interview with Jim Press of Chrysler in which he discussed the pressure the Detroit 3 are under regarding their marketing and community expenses, like racing support and charitable contributions.

Maybe karma will do its job, and all the southern NASCAR fans will choose to blame the southern Senatorial coterie...Richard Shelby et al...for that particular bit of damage to one of their favorite parts of the American cultural scene.

The connection between the car makers and NASCAR has become one that is in name only, IMHO. They used to race stock cars (the SC in NASCAR), but now the cars on the track bear very little resemblance to what we can get off of the showroom floor. "Win on Sunday, sell cars on Monday" is not so true anymore. So, will those who cheer the "Chevys" on the track buy a Ford if GM pulls out of racing?

I think not.

Do the automakers get much in the way of technical development from their NASCAR involvement (with the non-stock cars being run)?

I think not.

So, why are they spending the money?
 

AndyN

Moved On
Craig, you are so right! I don't get the way NASCAR has chosen to go. The cars, themselves' have nothing, but the name, in common with any vehicle you can buy in a showroom. Aren't even the bodies basically the same molding, dimensions etc.? Bizarre!

The closest form of (interesting and 'professional') racing using (somewhat) showroom vehicles would appear to be the Touring cars series - big in Britian and Europe, not so much here.

I'll miss Honda, but they'll be back - historically they always have. Maybe they'll be using their time to review the lacklustre performance they've had compared to, say, Toyota.
 
M

MIREGMGR

The connection between the car makers and NASCAR has become one that is in name only, IMHO. They used to race stock cars (the SC in NASCAR), but now the cars on the track bear very little resemblance to what we can get off of the showroom floor. "Win on Sunday, sell cars on Monday" is not so true anymore.

The experienced marketing teams at a number of competing car companies...including Toyota of course, for those otherwise inclined to play the "Detroit 3 = stupid" card...are convinced that major spectator racing does sell cars and light trucks. Quite a few, in fact. Of course, you may know better than them. :D

Do the automakers get much in the way of technical development from their NASCAR involvement (with the non-stock cars being run)? I think not.

For companies selling passenger cars and light trucks with ordinary performance at mass-market prices ...no, of course not. But it makes a comfortable cover story for what is purely an image and excitement building activity. As such, it contributes to the effectiveness of the marketing activity...and marketing effectiveness drives the bottom line, therefore you can expect that cover story to continue to be offered.

For companies selling relatively more exotic GT and sports cars, OTOH, the GT and F1 racing series do lead to technical advancement. That's well known in the automotive engineering world, whatever the lay community may think. But there as well, the primary reason for the activity is the aura it creates for the saleable product.
 
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Craig H.

The experienced marketing teams at a number of competing car companies...including Toyota of course, for those otherwise inclined to play the "Detroit 3 = stupid" card...are convinced that major spectator racing does sell cars and light trucks. Quite a few, in fact. Of course, you may know better than them. :D

Snarkiness aside, IMHO drag racing, for instance, does a better tie-in because a LOT of the basic hardware is available from car dealers, and even the funny cars bear a resemblance to street cars. My point was not that NASCAR does not sell cars, but that they do not sell cars like they used to.

If you want to see some good racing, try Rolex, American Le mans, etc.

My contention that the GM fans would not buy Ford if GM pulls out of NASCAR goes unchallenged.
 
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Ted Schmitt

Bad news for Honda, bad news for F1 and even worse for 3 Brazilian drivers who where going for the 2nd drivers spot... Rubens Barrichello (who scored more points that Jenson Button this year), Lucas Di Grassi and Bruno Senna (Ayrton´s nephew)...
 
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