Hospital-Developed, In-House Device - FDA Clearance?

Elsmar Forum Sponsor

Ronen E

Problem Solver
Staff member
Moderator
#12
I would have thought that as long as the hospital is not introducing the device into interstate commerce, that FDA has no authority to regulate it.
From the FD&C Act:
CHAPTER III—PROHIBITED ACTS AND PENALTIES
PROHIBITED ACTS
SEC. 301. [21 U.S.C. 331] The following acts and the causing thereof are hereby prohibited:
(...)
(g) The manufacture within any Territory of any food, drug, device, tobacco product, or cosmetic that is adulterated or misbranded.
CHAPTER II—DEFINITIONS 1
SEC. 201. [21 U.S.C. 321] For the purposes of this Act—
(a) (...)
(2) The term ‘‘Territory’’ means any Territory or possession of the United States, including the District of Columbia, and excluding
the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the Canal Zone.
SEC. 502. [21 U.S.C. 352] defines what constitutes device misbranding.
 
Last edited:

JeantheBigone

Quite Involved in Discussions
#13
I'm having difficulty applying the term "manufacture" to a single device which the hospital created for its own use.

To use an analogy, if in the course of treating a patient, a physician modifies an airway management device by attaching a hose to it to create a makeshift "device," FDA would not try to regulate that "device." If on the other hand the physician were to develop a design that is based on the concept of attaching a hose to an airway management device in order to market it, that would clearly be regulated.

Is this perhaps a grey area?
 

Watchcat

Trusted Information Resource
#14
Is this perhaps a grey area?
Maybe more like the line between the two clear extremes has the potential to get blurry.

Many physicians who develop devices in order to market them start by using their patients as guinea pigs. So one line that is potentially blurry is the one that falls between a one-off solution for the purpose of treating a particular patient and experimenting for the purpose of developing a marketable product.

Another is the difference between profiting from sales of a device and increasing profits by reducing costs. If you can make a device yourself, why buy from a manufacturer? If it is cheaper to make it yourself, and you will get paid the same amount for whatever procedure you use it for, then you would essentially be profiting from the use of your device.

Also, if you have no data on the safety and effectiveness of your makeshift device, where is the line between treatment and experimentation? At what point do you need IRB approval, informed consent? Most patients would not expect to be treated with any device not cleared or approved by FDA.

Whether FDA would try to regulate any of this is probably moot, since FDA has no way of knowing when physicians do this sort of thing.
 

OccamMan

Starting to get Involved
#15
If on the other hand the physician were to develop a design that is based on the concept of attaching a hose to an airway management device in order to market it, that would clearly be regulated.

Is this perhaps a grey area?
Maybe more like the line between the two clear extremes has the potential to get blurry.

Many physicians who develop devices in order to market them start by using their patients as guinea pigs. So one line that is potentially blurry is the one that falls between a one-off solution for the purpose of treating a particular patient and experimenting for the purpose of developing a marketable product.

Another is the difference between profiting from sales of a device and increasing profits by reducing costs. If you can make a device yourself, why buy from a manufacturer? If it is cheaper to make it yourself, and you will get paid the same amount for whatever procedure you use it for, then you would essentially be profiting from the use of your device.

Also, if you have no data on the safety and effectiveness of your makeshift device, where is the line between treatment and experimentation? At what point do you need IRB approval, informed consent? Most patients would not expect to be treated with any device not cleared or approved by FDA.

Whether FDA would try to regulate any of this is probably moot, since FDA has no way of knowing when physicians do this sort of thing.
This is a fairly unique device, that's tightly controlled to performance standards during use through multiple independent systems. There's no off-the-shelf equivalent for various reasons. I suspect that for any device this is a gray area, and for this device in particular there's a lot of unusual stuff, so probably next step is to chat with regulatory lawyers for an opinion. Thanks everyone for the info!
 

Ronen E

Problem Solver
Staff member
Moderator
#16
I'm having difficulty applying the term "manufacture" to a single device which the hospital created for its own use.

To use an analogy, if in the course of treating a patient, a physician modifies an airway management device by attaching a hose to it to create a makeshift "device," FDA would not try to regulate that "device." If on the other hand the physician were to develop a design that is based on the concept of attaching a hose to an airway management device in order to market it, that would clearly be regulated.

Is this perhaps a grey area?
Are you presenting this in relation to the OP or as a general interest?

You say "a single device", but it's unclear from the OP that that is the case. Just as another perspective, the MDR uses the term "industrial scale" (which is vague, but better than nothing) to draw some line between mass production and production involving a not-large number of units (definitely >1) that still justifies some sort of orderly compliance. I was thinking about the OP more as falling in that non-industrial (but >1) realm.

My other issue with your presentation is with "market it". This is a term not in the relevant legislation, so it complicates the discussion more than necessary. The scope of this specific discussion has been initially and intentionally a domain that is clearly grey in the context of "market" - in-house hospital make/use. It's not "marketing" in the everyday sense because there's typically no sale and no shipping, but nevertheless the scale can be notable and the need for regulation is not obviously dismissible because of a potentially "serial" nature and the potential effect on multiple patients.
 

JeantheBigone

Quite Involved in Discussions
#17
Are you presenting this in relation to the OP or as a general interest?

You say "a single device", but it's unclear from the OP that that is the case. Just as another perspective, the MDR uses the term "industrial scale" (which is vague, but better than nothing) to draw some line between mass production and production involving a not-large number of units (definitely >1) that still justifies some sort of orderly compliance. I was thinking about the OP more as falling in that non-industrial (but >1) realm.

My other issue with your presentation is with "market it". This is a term not in the relevant legislation, so it complicates the discussion more than necessary. The scope of this specific discussion has been initially and intentionally a domain that is clearly grey in the context of "market" - in-house hospital make/use. It's not "marketing" in the everyday sense because there's typically no sale and no shipping, but nevertheless the scale can be notable and the need for regulation is not obviously dismissible because of a potentially "serial" nature and the potential effect on multiple patients.
My post was addressing the OP. There was not enough information to tell whether there is one single device or more than one of the same type, but it sounded like one single device. There also isn't enough information to tell how the device was developed etc., so I used an example from my experience.

After looking into this a bit more it seems like it might be a candidate for the Custom Device Exemption, as it is "is not made generally available in finished form through labeling or advertising," assuming there are no more than five of them.

Definitely time for someone to take a closer look who has access to all of the needed information.
 

JeantheBigone

Quite Involved in Discussions
#19
As I understand it, it's "either or" but not both. If can be up to five devices customized for the use of one physician, or up to five devices customized for one patient.
 

Watchcat

Trusted Information Resource
#20
That makes sense too. However, I'm pretty sure this applies to a manufacturer making a customized device for a physician (fill a "custom" order), not to a physician making them for his own use in his own practice.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
D Hospital Decontamination and the MDR - Technical Files, UDI and PMS EU Medical Device Regulations 2
F Risk for Quality Assurance Department in a Hospital - Hospital Incident Reporting ISO 9000, ISO 9001, and ISO 9004 Quality Management Systems Standards 7
A Hospital IT expectations for connected medical device using WIFI Medical Information Technology, Medical Software and Health Informatics 0
K Hospital UDI requirements Other Medical Device and Orthopedic Related Topics 7
M Oxygen enriched environment applicability - Operating table used in general surgeries in hospital IEC 60601 - Medical Electrical Equipment Safety Standards Series 0
D How to Calibrate any Digital Sphygmomanometer under use for 2 years in a Hospital Forum News and General Information 1
M Contactless Hospital Bed Sensor Certification IEC 60601 - Medical Electrical Equipment Safety Standards Series 2
R IVD regulatory requirements for different hospital environments Other Medical Device and Orthopedic Related Topics 1
Q Mexico Medical Device Registration - Private Hospital Exemption Other Medical Device Regulations World-Wide 1
Wes Bucey Hospital Turns Down Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award World News 0
S Selling a CE Marked Product to a Hospital in Bulgaria Other Medical Device Regulations World-Wide 4
I What is an Ideal Control Chart for Hospital Surgery Infections? FMEA and Control Plans 2
2 Discussion about Hospital Carts Medical Information Technology, Medical Software and Health Informatics 7
S Lean Hospital - Implementing a quality/lean/six sigma program Lean in Manufacturing and Service Industries 3
Ronen E Cybersecurity for Medical Devices and Hospital Networks Medical Information Technology, Medical Software and Health Informatics 1
R EU requirements for Hospital Use Health IT software CE Marking (Conformité Européene) / CB Scheme 2
I Hospital Product/Service Realization and Monitoring/Measurement (ISO 9001) Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 4
D ISO 13485 for Hospital Sterilization Departments ISO 13485:2016 - Medical Device Quality Management Systems 2
R Hospital Grade Mains Plug US (NEMA 5-15) and Japan IEC 60601 - Medical Electrical Equipment Safety Standards Series 2
L Hospital Laboratory IVD (In Vitro Diagnostic) Transportation Classification in Brazil Other Medical Device Regulations World-Wide 2
R Should be Hospital Grade Plug be used in Class II Medical Equipment? IEC 60601 - Medical Electrical Equipment Safety Standards Series 3
Q Posey Bed or Hospital Bed Regulatory Process Japan Medical Device Regulations 1
A Hospital Internal Audit Check List Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 5
J Sterilisation Validation of Re-Usable Hospital Instruments ISO 13485:2016 - Medical Device Quality Management Systems 1
B Hospital Operating Room Regulations - Separate Entrances for Clean and Dirty Supplies Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 4
B Hospital Wall Mounts (for Display Monitors and other devices) - Requirements Occupational Health & Safety Management Standards 10
J Hospital Laboratory wants to apply ISO 9001 Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 10
S ISO 15189 Hospital Laboratory Accreditation - Forms and Templates needed Document Control Systems, Procedures, Forms and Templates 1
T Part 880.5100 AC-powered adjustable Hospital Bed - Applied Parts Marking or Labeling Other US Medical Device Regulations 1
S FCC Rules for Hospital Wireless Medical Devices 21 CFR Part 820 - US FDA Quality System Regulations (QSR) 7
B Common Sterilization Methods in Hospital - Prevalence? Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 2
V Is a Hospital Grade Power Cord Required? Class I Medical Device Other US Medical Device Regulations 4
somashekar Requirements for Patient Gowning & other Hospital Clothes, sheets wrt. static charge? Other Medical Device Related Standards 2
xcanals_tecno-med.es ISO 13485 in Hospital Central Sterilization and Clinical Engineering Services ISO 13485:2016 - Medical Device Quality Management Systems 27
P Class I & II Rx Medical Devices - Pre-Hospital Market Distribution questions ISO 13485:2016 - Medical Device Quality Management Systems 3
D Best Practices for Safe Handling of Rented Hospital Mattresses Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 4
M Risk Management Standards - Hospital Information System (electronic health records) Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 4
L Hospital Grade and Medical Grade power cord differences? Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 2
Sidney Vianna Ball Memorial Hospital - The first Indiana hospital to receive NIAHO accreditation Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 1
S Biocompatibility - Hospital Bed ISO 13485:2016 - Medical Device Quality Management Systems 12
B Identifying Peak Demand and Usage with Start/End Time - Hospital Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 3
Sidney Vianna Medicare to Cease Payment for Hospital Error Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 0
M Possible thread moves? (To the New Hospital and Health Care Providers forum) Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 3
Sidney Vianna New protocol for hospital accreditation: NIAHO. Includes ISO 9001 Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 10
J Why document control matters - Hospital or Health Care Environment Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 2
Jim Wynne The hospital: Worst place to be, especially if you're sick Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 27
D Presenting TOP 10 diseases (Number of in-patients by diseases) in our hospital Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 17
D Hospital benchmarking process - Rate of unplanned re-admissions Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 5
D The right way to monitor in-patient incidents in a hospital Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 4
D Hospital Infection Rates - American Journal of Infection Control Hospitals, Clinics & other Health Care Providers 4
Similar threads


















































Top Bottom