Search the Elsmar Cove!
**Search ALL of Elsmar.com** with DuckDuckGo Especially for content not in the forum
Such as files in the Cove "Members" Directory

How does one get into the Quality Control (Quality Management) field?

S

SirLancelot

#11
I just wanted to thank everyone for the advice...it has been most valuable in my career considerations. I'm about to graduate in the summer, and am trying to find an entry level position in the meantime. I would like to work in the aviation industry.

I do have one last question:

If I take an entry level job as a quality control inspector/technician (physical product measurement and looking at control charts and documenting results), could this lead to a more analytical QA position?

In other words, do QC tech's get stuck in dead end jobs?

Thanks again
 

pearson114

Involved In Discussions
#12
Hi SirLancelot,

I'll give you a short description of my relatively short career so far. Finished school (UK) with average GCSE grades, went to study Business Studies, English Language and Media Studies at college. Failed Business Studies as I spent too much time in the pub playing darts, passed Media with flying colours (impossible not to) and did ok on the Eng Lange exam.

The option of University was there but it had never interested me, so at 18 I left college with no idea of what to do next. (I'd been working since I was 15 in the kitchen in a local restaurant, but knew that wasn't the career path for me).

Behind all of this, I'd been with my then-girlfriend since the age of 14, her father was an Ops Manager at a local Aerospace company manufacturing composite wing panels. He got me a temporary job through the summer on minimum wage filing in the office there.

I got there, starting filing and asked questions about everything. What's a FAIR? Why do we need Certificate of Conformities? What's AS9100? Where can I learn more about this? Can I watch the Lab Tests being done? Can I help out in an internal audit...?

The Quality Director wanted 'a chat'. I was worried that I'd spent so much time asking questions that I'd gotten into trouble for being behind on the filing, during the discussion he told me that he wanted me to join the Quality team as a Quality Technician, would put me through my HNC in Quality Management and give me a mentor within the business.

For the next 4 years I worked my socks off, completed my qualification, and learnt ten times as much with on the job experience. I ended up having a non-work related issue and left the company but will always appreciate what they did for me and would be happy to return in the future should the right opportunity arise.

Since then, I've been on a steep climb, I've worked in medical, aerospace, oil, nuclear and gas, I've been Quality Management Rep, Quality Manager and now a Senior Quality Systems Engineer for 2nd tier aerospace manufacturer. All has come with hard work and taking a chance when I've seen an opportunity to better my career with either further knowledge or a higher salary.

I'm not just trying to 'big myself up' here, because I know there's an awful lot of people that have been far more successful than I, however my point is this.... Whatever you want to do you can achieve it one way or another. Luck does play a part, but don't be afraid to throw yourself in at the deep end. If you feel you're getting stuck in a dead end job, tell your manager, ask what opportunities for progression are available and if you don't like their answer, I'm sure there'll be another place out there that will suit your needs and wants.

I've found that to be good at Quality, you have to have a certain passion for Quality. Without it, it's pretty much pointless.

Good luck!
 
T

True Position

#13
I just wanted to thank everyone for the advice...it has been most valuable in my career considerations. I'm about to graduate in the summer, and am trying to find an entry level position in the meantime. I would like to work in the aviation industry.

I do have one last question:

If I take an entry level job as a quality control inspector/technician (physical product measurement and looking at control charts and documenting results), could this lead to a more analytical QA position?

In other words, do QC tech's get stuck in dead end jobs?

Thanks again
It would depend on the size of the organization. In a very large organization, probably not since your job can be very niche with little exposure to the quality systems side. In a smaller firm you would be working directly with the engineers, production, and for the quality manager. This type of experience could be very valuable with your business background. Unfortunately in small organizations there's little room for advancement from Quality Tech so you'd be looking to leave in a few years.
 

jackm

Mobile App Developer
#14
Re: How does one get into the quality control field?

From my personal experience:
1. Get an entry-level job in an industry that fascinates you
2. Care more about the quality of the products (or services) than your co-workers
3. Openly criticize management for their uneven attention to quantity over quality (this is especially effective when done at a company-wide meeting to introduce the new Quality Manager)
4. Welcome yourself to QA when they ask you to join that department

(Results may vary.)
Before entering in quality control field everyone should know basics about quality control and quality assurance. QC field is very fascinating you can grow your skill as well as your career in this field.
 

optomist1

A Sea of Statistics
Trusted
#15
I vote for a QA Quality Assurance endeavor....generally speaking, given that one has accrued the requisite tech skill set Stats, Math, etc...two key elements will help determine your success:
1) Your personal powers of persuasion,
2) Your persistence

Lastly, I found this to be true...and is one of the key elements in the success of Toyota Production system....get to know, and establish a great rapport with the process line operators they offer a wealth of valuable/timely information and insight usually not found or captured in the ERP, or company IT systems and applications.....Bravo on your choice!!
 

John Broomfield

Staff member
Super Moderator
#16
Study the nature of work* and how it adds value in the fastest way possible without damaging the environment.

Then, if this is your inherent strength, you’ll be set to have a lifelong and most enjoyable career.

* by humans and machines.
 

dsanabria

Quite Involved in Discussions
#17
Hello, This is my first post here.

I am currently a University student about to graduate with a business degree...however, I have had a course in quality control, and several courses in statistics and programming (python), and am strong in math. I have an excellent GPA.

I would really like to work in quality management. I find it fascinating.
But it seems many job openings only require a high-school diploma.

Now, I'm fine with that, but I don't want to sell myself short either. I don't really have any work experience at all, so I'm willing to work from the ground up.

However, I'm wondering if there are no other opportunities, which focus more on the statistical/analysis side of things, yet are still entry level, and don't necessarily need an engineering background.

Perhaps I ask for too much.

I would love it if anyone could elaborate on the opportunities. Thank you very much.

1. Go to job sites and look for opening in inspection, QA, QC in any field.
2. Apply and get ready for a no answer but be professional and persistent
3. Volunteer to do many task - Inspection with different equipment, filing, shipping and receiving inspection, supplier inspection ....
4. once you are comfortable - move on - don't get stuck in a never ending position.
5. Doors will open
 
#18
Same as any other field, by patience, persistence and dumb luck. :)

My best advice (echoed by others) is that you not on the job and instead focus on the industry that has the job. In other words, aim for any kind of job in a company that has QA/QC...and, even better, that is committed to it. Learn the industry, company, and how QA/QC fits in. If that's what you want to do, and you are any good at it, with patience, persistence and some luck, you will wind up there sooner or later. And, with patience, persistence and some luck, you will wind up at whatever level and type of responsibility you are suited to within the field, based on your education, training, motivation, interest and talent. Equally likely, you will discover other jobs that appeal to you more and pursue those instead.

As for degree level, the universities keep cranking them out, so it seems likely we will continue to see degree creep. QA/QC in particular has become increasingly sophisticated over the years. In another 10-20 years, you probably won't be worried that you have aimed too low, but that you won't be able to remain competitive in the workforce with a mere undergraduate degree.

And just to keep it real, my favorite two quotes about Quality (both from Covers):

"Because management doesn't give a rat's patootie about Quality."
"Compliance hijacked Quality years ago."

Do it if and because you like doing it, not because you expect anyone to thank you for it or to to think it's half as important as you do.
 
Top Bottom