How to develop a Control Plan from a PFMEA (Process FMEA)

D

David DeLong

#21
Thanks - I do agree with everything stated in the APQP manual including the fact that a Control Plan is an output from the Process FMEA.

I would always suggest having a draft Control Plan with the Quality representative during the PFMEA meeting and it would be reviewed by the team from a controls perspective. The Process FMEA team could then recommend changes to the Control Plan and it would be changed accordingly. The PFMEA does have input in the final Control Plan.

I would never go into a Process FMEA without any controls concept or using another Control Plan of some other part. I don't think that would be considered being prepared for the meeting.

Maybe a lot of people have waited until the conclusion of the Process FMEA and have then developed a Control Plan directly from the FMEA documentation. That is hard to do and in my opinion, having the team scrutiinize a draft Control Plan may be more beneficial.
 

Stijloor

Staff member
Super Moderator
#22
Dave, you can use the AIAG manuals as Sacred Received Knowledge if you want to. If you do it consistently, though, you'll wind up dazed and confused. One of the primary reasons that the US auto industry is headed inexorably down the tube is that they have no clue as to how to deal with suppliers, and believe that containers are equal to the things contained, The entirety of the FMEA manual could be condensed to eight or ten pages (without losing anything meaningful) and incorporated into the APQP manual, where it belongs. That'll never happen though, because it makes sense.

There are APQP processes that can (and should) happen concurrently rather than serially. The idea behind the PCP being output of the PFMEA process doesn't necessarily mean that there is no control plan prior to initiation of the PFMEA process. It means that when the triad (PFD/PFMEA/PCP) is complete, there is a logical progression in that order.

For each operation shown on the PFD there is a line item on the PFMEA. During the PFMEA process, each line item is examined for improvement opportunities. The control plans of similar processes may be (and should be) used so as to (A) avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and (B) determine whether improvements to current controls are feasible. If there are no current controls (no similar process or operations) then you simple enter "none" in the Current Process Controls field and move on. When the PFMEA process is complete, a current control plan might be co-opted and modified, or a new one might be created. Whichever happens, the new current control plan will have happened as a result of PFMEA output.

Note also that PFMEA is a process and not a document, and any corroborative consideration for improvement that results in a new or modified control plan may logically (if not strictly literally) be said to result from PFMEA.



I don't think anyone here is suggesting that all process knowledge--documented or otherwise--emanates from the PFMEA process.
Excellent points Jim!

The original intent of the AIAG Core Tool Manuals was to harmonize the various American OEM guidelines for the preparation of a particular automotive program. The AIAG guidelines are not bad and I believe that smart suppliers have learned how to utilize them to their advantage. It is sad to see however that the original intent has been abandoned resulting in a plethora of all kinds of CSR's, Special Process requirements, etc., You can't turn around or there is another requirements/initiative announcement on the AIAG website. It is driving the suppliers absolutely nuts. Unless the American OEM suppliers start pushing back, this will not end. In the mean time, we'll try to make the best of it.

Stijloor.
 

Caster

An Early Cover
#23
Unless the American OEM suppliers start pushing back, this will not end. In the mean time, we'll try to make the best of it
My ex boss (now a victim of right sizing) half jokingly suggested that we form a "suppliers union" to be able to effectively stand up against the endless new requirements creep from our customers. Could this become a new topic?
 

Stijloor

Staff member
Super Moderator
#24
My ex boss (now a victim of right sizing) half jokingly suggested that we form a "suppliers union" to be able to effectively stand up against the endless new requirements creep from our customers. Could this become a new topic?
Hi Caster,

You make an excellent point!

Why don't you start a new thread? I'm sure that folks will respond. There's a lot of frustration in automotive supplier land.

I think that anyone has the right to vent steam, but let's also come up with constructive ideas and see what we can suggest and/or do to improve the situation.

Stijloor.
 
S

sriharivikram

#25
many a thanks for sharing the information!
i got everything that i needed for now in our forum thank you:thanx:!!!
 
L

Laura3

#26
:applause: Hello to all-
I wanted to shout out my appreciation for this site, especially the contributors who provided their expertise. I have been "secretly" trolling the site ( noit yet qualified to participate!) and learning how to complete the AQAP process required of me.
Thanks to all of you, I have successfully completed a "family" pfmea and am moving onto the control plan. Special shout out to Tom Vehoski & IceZebra for setting the RPN & priorities straight. Jim Wynn, I'm using your valued info as I move onto the Control Plan!
L:thanx:
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#27
:applause: Hello to all-
I wanted to shout out my appreciation for this site, especially the contributors who provided their expertise. I have been "secretly" trolling the site ( noit yet qualified to participate!) and learning how to complete the AQAP process required of me.
Thanks to all of you, I have successfully completed a "family" pfmea and am moving onto the control plan. Special shout out to Tom Vehoski & IceZebra for setting the RPN & priorities straight. Jim Wynn, I'm using your valued info as I move onto the Control Plan!
L:thanx:
It's good to have you here, and being here is the only qualification you need for participation. Feel free to jump in whenever you feel the urge, and don't hesitate to ask questions as you go along.
 
B

billablade

#29
Can any one help me providing a good example Control Plan for Hot Dip Galvanization process. Your help in this regard will be highly appreciated. Regards
 

Jim Wynne

Super Moderator
#30
Can any one help me providing a good example Control Plan for Hot Dip Galvanization process. Your help in this regard will be highly appreciated. Regards
Welcome to the Cove. :D
The best way to develop a control plan is to do a PFMEA first. Doing so will give you guidance in what needs to be controlled and how it might be done. Your control plan should be concerned with methods for controlling the process, which would include variables that are specific to the parts in question, line capacity and other things that don't lend themselves to generic description.
 

Top Bottom