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How to increase the technological knowledge of employees?

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Fillemon

#11
Hello all,

thanks for all reactions. I will certainly use some of the ideas posted here, adapted to the company situation of course.

An extra difficulty for training the engineering people is that most of them are located at our customers' sites all over Europe. This is why I would implement some kind of Wiki (btw: does anyone have experiences with this?). In this way I would like to (for example) avoid that the same problem that occurs on two places is solved two times, i.e. make some kind of "experiences" or "best practices" site of it. Or can you think of other ways to handle this?
 
B

bpugazhendhi

#12
Technical training for the 'technical persons' is a difficult job. It should not be too little, it should not be irrelevant and finally it should result in improved performance. In my view, the starting point should be the customer. What the customer feels about the product, what problems he faces using our product, what the competitors are able to provide better, what improvements the customers expect from us, etc? The answer to these questions will help identify the gaps in knowledge or skill or attitude of the 'techys'. From that one can build on the required training intervention. As regards training persons located in widely dispersed area, the company's internet site can be used to train. If the company has an intranet site, that would be much better.
 
C

Citizen Kane

#13
Hi !

1st, when a new person is hired, you can prepare for him an Integration Training Sheet in whitch you can include basic trainings for production (ex. components, layouts, test equipments, scheduling, maintenance, ...) and also trainings with the linked departments (finance, purchasing, logistics, etc.) - each one for 30-60 min. The owner of the mini-training must sign the paper brought by the people who gets the training.

2nd, is good to organize periodically visits in production or from production to the related departments. You can show here the processes, but also the products.

3rd, when you have workshops, organize them near the production area (or with practical activities there) - not in a hotel far, far away from the plant :)

4th, you should have installed a department meeting in witch are invited all the people - PMs, maintenance, process eng., quality, logistics, etc. - so, each PM has some basic knowledge from the other's project (could be use them as backup afterwards) and also you will make them aware with the problems from the production area (this will make them observe wrong things in production and be pro-active)
 
#14
I have a super induction training package that proved most effective.

It starts off with an intro to the company, who they are, locations, what they make and where products are supplied. There is a map of where products are installed and from each location there's a photograph of every product.

Then there are simple diagrams showing how the product works- nothing too technical. Just the basics.

Then we discuss critical components, how they are made and we show defects and how and why they can fail.

We go on to explain the Quality problems and implications as a result of those defects. That includes customer complaints and how the defective products impact the customer and inevitably, can result in the customer going elsewhere.

The final part of the presentation is about encouraging staff to take responsibility, informing them how they can make a difference and most of all, telling them how important their job functions are.

We found that after this induction, we saw vast improvements in Quality that included a reduction in customer complaints and an increase in staff morale.
 

Stijloor

Staff member
Super Moderator
#15
I have a super induction training package that proved most effective.

It starts off with an intro to the company, who they are, locations, what they make and where products are supplied. There is a map of where products are installed and from each location there's a photograph of every product.

Then there are simple diagrams showing how the product works- nothing too technical. Just the basics.

Then we discuss critical components, how they are made and we show defects and how and why they can fail.

We go on to explain the Quality problems and implications as a result of those defects. That includes customer complaints and how the defective products impact the customer and inevitably, can result in the customer going elsewhere.

The final part of the presentation is about encouraging staff to take responsibility, informing them how they can make a difference and most of all, telling them how important their job functions are.

We found that after this induction, we saw vast improvements in Quality that included a reduction in customer complaints and an increase in staff morale.
Great program!! Thanks for sharing. :agree1:

Do you emphasize Top Management's role as well? Or even better; include them in your presentation?

Stijloor.
 
#16
Great program!! Thanks for sharing. :agree1:

Do you emphasize Top Management's role as well? Or even better; include them in your presentation?

Stijloor.
Thank you.

There was no need. Every staff member's role was emphasised, and that included top management who played a very keen and active Quality role within this company and who were in attendance at every presentation.

Now that is the sort of company I love to work for.
 
S

ssz102

#17
this topic is very nice, i also learning much knowledge!

back to the subjects, i think if you know the relation for every dept will be much better for you! that's mean how to cooperation per dept!
 

riosimbolon

Starting to get Involved
#18
Now I handle improvement at printing company, they have high rejection rate at printing line (6-7%). one of existing causes is involving employees (operator and leader) in their problem.
Superviser or manager thinks that they can handle it, but don't.
printing technology is got from PFMEA and control plan. I evaluated and fixed them then introduced fmea and control plan for printing process to operator. we create a simple training to introduce a fmea and a control plan, what is risk if they dont follow it... etc. I introduce a Printing technology through a PFMEA and control plan, an now update july 2012, one line printing , achieved rejection rate 2.4 %.
 
B

bharatbuk

#19
Many of organizations facing these kind of problems, now you have lots of suggestions, needs to handle this training session nicely peoples shouldn't feel the burden about this training because it will be extra activity with their regular work practices.!
 


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