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How to interpret TS Clause 7.5.1.4 Preventive and Predictive Maintenance?

D

deminika

#1
How to interprete the following requirement:
" The organization shall identify key process equipment (...) As a minimum this system (preventive maintenance system) shall include the following:
- packaging and preservation of equipment, tooling and gauging".
Can you give me some examples of equipment, tooling and gauging? Is that mean that some gauges used for preventive (like thermometers etc.) shall be also calibrated?
 
D

D.Scott

#3
Re: How to interpretate TS point 7.5.1.4 Preventive and predictive maintenance

How to interprete the following requirement:
" The organization shall identify key process equipment (...) As a minimum this system (preventive maintenance system) shall include the following:
- packaging and preservation of equipment, tooling and gauging".
Can you give me some examples of equipment, tooling and gauging? Is that mean that some gauges used for preventive (like thermometers etc.) shall be also calibrated?
There is a separate requirement for calibration. This requirement deals with the packing and storage of the tools and equipment.

Best example I can think of would be the molds used for injection molding. These molds get put on and taken off all the time. When they are not in use they are stored. How do you store them? How do you identify and package them? Is mold maintenance scheduled during the down time of the mold or is it sometimes in use when it is supposed to be in the shop? How is the mold protected from rust?

This applies also to gauges when they are not in use. How are they stored, protected and maintained?

Dave
 
D

deminika

#4
Re: How to interpretate TS point 7.5.1.4 Preventive and predictive maintenance

Thank you very much. It makes sense.
 

antoine.dias

Quite Involved in Discussions
#5
Re: How to interpretate TS point 7.5.1.4 Preventive and predictive maintenance

Very good example given by Dave.

Another example would be the following:

There is a dedicated production line for a certain part, delivered to an automotive customer. At one time the production at the customer's site stops.
The supplier however has to be able to deliver the service quantities for a couple of years.

This dedicated line may be disassembled then but has to be "packed and preserved" so it can be used again when (a service delivery of) let's say a couple of hundreds parts are necessary at the customer.

Best regards,

Antoine
 

Tom W

Living the Dream...
#6
Re: How to interpretate TS point 7.5.1.4 Preventive and predictive maintenance

How to interprete the following requirement:
" The organization shall identify key process equipment (...) As a minimum this system (preventive maintenance system) shall include the following:
- packaging and preservation of equipment, tooling and gauging".
Can you give me some examples of equipment, tooling and gauging? Is that mean that some gauges used for preventive (like thermometers etc.) shall be also calibrated?
Just an FYI on this....

I work at a commercial heat treater and we just had a minor finding on our control of tooling and equipment. It seems that there is a big push to check this in the TS world right now.

The equipment in question was the equipment we use to straighten our baskets and fixtures for holding the parts. A press and a welding machine. As repair equipment for the tooling it had to have a PM program on it. Not a big deal; quit easy to include actually but surprised at the emphasis on this after 5 years of being registered to TS.
 
#7
Re: How to interpretate TS point 7.5.1.4 Preventive and predictive maintenance

Dave's given a good reponse.

You can also consider a lot of simple items which also help to keep the line running. If you don't take care of the filters, lubricants, bearings, belts, hoses, electrical components etc. which are changed out to keep production machinery running (and not many places have really good controls), you should look at that too.

The TS customers are looking to avoid having supply chain problems because a machine went down, production stopped and all that was needed to fix the line is a bearing - which no-one knew was out of stock and is on a 5 week lead time, because it's...............'special'.......:rolleyes:
 
M

Monypennyuk

#8
Re: How to interpretate TS point 7.5.1.4 Preventive and predictive maintenance

I had a lot of worries regarding this section. ( We are on stage 2 of our TS approval)

We have a LOT of machines here, many of which are really under utalised ( we have figures to show this), and others where we have banks of the same machines.

Basically we made up a Maintenance PLAN for KEY EQUIPMENT ONLY. Ie the machines that if they failed / broke down, would cause us problems and in turn possibly delay supply to the customer. Things like Air compressors, Furnaces, Or certain presses of which we only have One or Two of.

These are the items that have MAINTENANCE PLANNED in, and for which we hold spares of items in case of failure.

Another way we are looking to cover some of this is to introduce a very basic Operator Centered Maintenance OCM, which is basically a controlled version of what the machine operator does or should do. Ie Daily oil and air checks, Weekly cleaning, Etc. The little things that keep the machines ticking over and running smoothly.
 
C

chaosweary

#9
In my experience 3rd party auditors discount your maintenance as predictive if it is based on any particular number, for example we change out stencils every after every 200 uses, even if you came up with the number through data analysis. They want to see some type of maintenance based on a more creative approach, it turns them on, such as the pitch of harmonic resonance of the stencil correlates to breakdown of the equipment within two weeks. So if the operator heres some high pitch squealing we change out a particular component. :D
 
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