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How to represent the ?real? or ?actual? players in organizational chart?

LesPiles

Involved In Discussions
#1
Question: I am reviewing the organizational chart for the next coming of our registrar (ISO maintenance audit) in a few months. Some managers and other people are on "burn out" (on sick leave e.g. living on insurance). Unfortunately, these leaves are quite long (several months).

"The question" : How do you represent the positions in your organizational chart in such cases?

I do not want to create any unfortunate incidents to those who are absent but people who continue in the day-to-day must know the functional organization as is currently, isn?t ?


LesPiles
 

John Broomfield

Staff member
Super Moderator
#2
Re: How to represent the ?real? or ?actual? players in organizational chart ?

Question: I am reviewing the organizational chart for the next coming of our registrar (ISO maintenance audit) in a few months. Some managers and other people are on "burn out" (on sick leave e.g. living on insurance). Unfortunately, these leaves are quite long (several months).

"The question" : How do you represent the positions in your organizational chart in such cases?

I do not want to create any unfortunate incidents to those who are absent but people who continue in the day-to-day must know the functional organization as is currently, isn?t ?


LesPiles
LesPiles,

Avoid names on your org chart. Life is too short. Include only job title or description of authority and responsibility.

In a separate table you could show the names of who doubles for whom when they are absent. Expect to be asked for evidence of competence.

I trust you have an active corrective action project for the work environment not being conducive to quality per clause 6.4?

John
 
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PaulJSmith

#3
Re: How to represent the ?real? or ?actual? players in organizational chart ?

I agree with John. One of the first things I did when I came into my current position was to remove the names from the Organizational Chart and leave just the position titles. Short of a major organizational change, you'll never have to amend that chart just because of a personnel change.

As for who covers their duties while they're out, couldn't that be addressed in job descriptions, however your company deals with that?
 
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pldey42

#4
Question: I am reviewing the organizational chart for the next coming of our registrar (ISO maintenance audit) in a few months. Some managers and other people are on "burn out" (on sick leave e.g. living on insurance). Unfortunately, these leaves are quite long (several months).

"The question" : How do you represent the positions in your organizational chart in such cases?

I do not want to create any unfortunate incidents to those who are absent but people who continue in the day-to-day must know the functional organization as is currently, isn?t ?


LesPiles
I think the important thing is showing people, today, who's doing what, and then showing the auditor what you do - and that it's effective.

So, how do people find out who's doing what today? Is it effective?

ISO 9001 doesn't require an org chart, just that this information is communicated. So as long as everyone knows who's actually doing what, today, the requirement is satisfied. If they're actually puzzled and wasting time trying to find out, then I'd suggest doing it faster and not waiting for the auditor, for that wasted time could be translating into missed delivery dates.

(As a consultant I've often been told that the org chart is out of date because there is so much churn that keeping it correct is too expensive. Which makes no sense. If there's lots of churn it needs to be up to date to avoid everyone wasting time finding people, which of course is why it's a requirement of the standard.)

Hope this helps
Pat
 
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