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I am Going to Implement Deming's 12th Point for my Staff

ScottK

Not out of the crisis
Staff member
Super Moderator
#1
Remove barriers that rob people in management and in engineering of their right to pride of workmanship. This means, inter alia, abolishment of the annual or merit rating and of management by objective.
The current process is the standard "annual review" scorecard and I am prepared to butt heads over it.

Have any of you attempted this culture change before?
 

Jen Kirley

Quality and Auditing Expert
Staff member
Admin
#4
I hate evals because they are usually done so poorly. But objective based people tend to love them. Unfortunately they so often fall victim to the urge to compare everyone against their own idealistic views of themselves. This type of evaluation and performance pay enthusiasts are not easy to win over, but maybe you can make changes to the program instead of trying to do away with it.

Maybe you can make rewards team efforts instead of individuals.

Consult the book 1001 Ways To Reward Employees.

Find means to measure their output in ways where other processes don't suffer if such a group hits the afterburners. I'm sure this type of (intentional or not) sabotage was one of the reasons for Deming's Rule #12.

Find meaningful measurements by tying in performance with business results so people can actually see what their efforts bring. "Ricky's team reduced cycle time by changing the order of radiator installation. No longer do assemblers need to lean over the radiator to install other engine parts. This also resulted in X reduction of back injuries reported from this assembly point and $ savings from lost production hours alone!" This is the hardest of the four ideas as you might imagine.
 

Helmut Jilling

Auditor / Consultant
#5
This is the only point one of Deming's Points that I don't agree with. But, I agree, if we do it, it should be meaningful. Then, maybe he would have liked them too...(or, not.).
 

ScottK

Not out of the crisis
Staff member
Super Moderator
#6
Yeah, and the front of my head is still mushy from banging it against walls.:frust:

Culture will resist change.
It's what I've been doing since I got out of college.
Some places I've been more successful than others.
I'm optomistic here, at least about point 12.

Points 8 and 9 are going to be the toughies here.
 

ScottK

Not out of the crisis
Staff member
Super Moderator
#7
This is the only point one of Deming's Points that I don't agree with. But, I agree, if we do it, it should be meaningful. Then, maybe he would have liked them too...(or, not.).
That's the problem... Every place I've worked they have been meaningless.
This isn't to say that the whole annual review process is meaningless (even though in most places I've worked they are considered a joke) - it's the RATING or SCORE CARD portion of the review is.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
#8
Read "The One Minute Manager" to see what Ken Blanchard has to say about the "annual evaluation".

To understand culture change I'll refer you to "Putting the One Minute Manager to Work" by Ken Blanchard

Both are over 20 years old but they contain some very good lessons
 
#9
I recall a similar discussion in the ASQ Forums a few years back (before they got the Jive software) and, sad to say, the ASQ staff did not archive the discussion in the software switch.

Steve Prevette and I were very strident in adhering to the Deming philosophy in decrying employee rating and ranking systems, largely based on the results of the Deming Red Bead experiment, which demonstrates the fallacy behind employee evaluation and exposes the truth that the employee is powerless in the face of a bollixed system.

I suggest ONLY top management can change whether the organization uses employee evaluations. One thing that might be helpful is inviting only the top management to take part in a Red Bead show as willing workers so they can experience first hand how unfair evaluations can be when the system determines individual success or failure, NOT the effort of the employee.
 
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