I Need Help with Drafting Conventions!!!

C

ChuckawallaJoe

PLEASE HELP! (Insert gurgling/drowning noises.)

I'm getting complaints from machining that drawings are not being dimensioned according to "recognized standards." We are also having problems getting drawings out of engineering with the correct revision levels and consistent title blocks. I found out there are two recognized standards in the USA that might help us:

ISO 8015 and ANSI/ASME Y14.

But I'm not an engineer, designer or draftsman and don't understand the pros and cons of each option. So, I don't know which direction to go here.

We make carbon fiber parts and work with all kinds of customers, mostly from USA and GB and mostly from OUR drawings. We are putting together an ISO 9001 QMS. I'm looking for suggestions on how to standardize drawings, title blocks, part naming, revision process and such. Suggestions to make this clear and STANDARD will be truly appreciated.

Thanks.

:tg:
 

Michael_M

Trusted Information Resource
I would get with the Engineers and draftsman regarding this and get their input. ISO9001:2008 has 7.3 dedicated to design and development. I have not worked at a place that used 7.3 nor have I ever audited 7.3 so I know next to nothing about it, but I assume it has requirements for revision control and maybe something about naming/titles. Also, remember, design and development will still fall under the requirements of 4.2.3 control of documents and 4.2.4 control of records.

In the end, what you have to do is defined by the standard, how you do it is defined by you.
 

Wes Bucey

Prophet of Profit
PLEASE HELP! (Insert gurgling/drowning noises.)

I'm getting complaints from machining that drawings are not being dimensioned according to "recognized standards." We are also having problems getting drawings out of engineering with the correct revision levels and consistent title blocks. I found out there are two recognized standards in the USA that might help us:

ISO 8015 and ANSI/ASME Y14.

But I'm not an engineer, designer or draftsman and don't understand the pros and cons of each option. So, I don't know which direction to go here.

We make carbon fiber parts and work with all kinds of customers, mostly from USA and GB and mostly from OUR drawings. We are putting together an ISO 9001 QMS. I'm looking for suggestions on how to standardize drawings, title blocks, part naming, revision process and such. Suggestions to make this clear and STANDARD will be truly appreciated.

Thanks.

:tg:
A little background, please.
Are these in-house engineering drawings or from customers?
If in-house, how many engineers and or draftspeople?
Are they hand drawn (drafting tools) or computer drafted?
Are there lots of drawings (hundreds) or only a few (less than 100)?
What is the date of the oldest current version? the newest?

The reason I ask is that some small shops will mistakenly try to adopt a system more apt for a huge multi-national and vice-versa. Scale your system to the actual need for the forseeable future.
 
C

ChuckawallaJoe

Are these in-house engineering drawings or from customers?

Mostly in house.

If in-house, how many engineers and or draftspeople?

Half a dozen.

Are they hand drawn (drafting tools) or computer drafted?

CAD.

Are there lots of drawings (hundreds) or only a few (less than 100)?

Thousands.

What is the date of the oldest current version? the newest?

We have 14 years worth, but I'm mostly concerned with the current stuff we have to make CORRECTLY today.

Our plan right now, is to finish writing the document control procedure for engineering and retrain everyone. This should help with filing on the network. And write a formal document checking work instruction because, apparently, that process is not being taken seriously enough, or is being rushed, or isn't well understood. :whip:
 

Wes Bucey

Prophet of Profit
Our plan right now, is to finish writing the document control procedure for engineering and retrain everyone. This should help with filing on the network. And write a formal document checking work instruction because, apparently, that process is not being taken seriously enough, or is being rushed, or isn't well understood. :whip:
Computer drafting is terrific. Whoever sold your company the software will have a scheme for setting up:

  1. standard template including title blocks, tolerances, etc.
  2. standard Bill of Materials boxes (one click and the entire box automagically appears)
  3. automatic signature (based on log-in), dating, even elapsed work time
  4. automatic referrals for check off reviews and signatures
  5. real time grid showing every project, engineer, status of checkoff, etc.
  6. automatic versioning (need special permissions to pull up obsolete versions)
  7. there is even software available for non-licensees of the drafting software to view drawings without resident drafting software or even overlay notes and markups on existing drawing
  8. software is available to maintain audit trail of who worked on drawings, who altered drawings, viewed, or copied drawings.
Most of the drafting software companies have this stuff available in-house or obtainable as off-the-shelf add-ons from other companies. Your operation is probably too small to justify creating your own software and database tracking from scratch. Knowing such things exist is half the battle.
 
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