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IATF 16949 requirements for Product Safety Procedures

#1
This is something that is required for our audit...We do not do any safety products, but it is still required while getting IATF certified...Any examples or tips that can lead me in the right direction?
 
#4
OK, so you should put in place a clarification question/statement, when quoting the work - or any changes - to confirm with the customer that the item isn't safety related.
 

John C. Abnet

Teacher,Sensei,Kennari
#5
Good day @LexiH22 ;
I would council that your management system should be set up to handle applicable product safety characteristics if/when the situation arises. For example, what if your sales team quotes a product that has safety critical process or product characteristic identified on the drawing? Who reviews this (during feasibility study?). If the job is accepted how is this characteristic/process identified at the point of manufacture? Who is responsible? If a problem arises with a safety critical process or product characteristic, what is the escalation plan? Who is responsible? If your organization accepts a job with safety critical characteristics or process, who reviews to see if there can be an impact by your external providers? Who is responsible for communicating these to your external providers.

If you are an existing automotive tier manufacturer, I would assume that there are existing controls within your process, to which these considerations can be added without creating something entirely new.

For example: An IF-THEN decision tree (i.e. IF the customer identifies a safety critical process and/or product characteristics) simply allow the decision tree to identify WHO does WHAT and WHEN. This could be applied to...
1- Initial feasibility study (should we take this job? If so, what are the risks?)
2- APQP process development
a) Identify internally what characteristics/processes apply
b) Communicate externally to any affected external providers (purchasing identifies? quality verifies? )
3- Nonconforming product control
a) point to a determined IF-THEN escalation diagram as part of the reaction process

These are simply provided as food for thought. But in my experience, it is hard to predict today what sales may commit to tomorrow.

Hope this helps.
Be well.
 
#6
Good day @LexiH22 ;
I would council that your management system should be set up to handle applicable product safety characteristics if/when the situation arises. For example, what if your sales team quotes a product that has safety critical process or product characteristic identified on the drawing? Who reviews this (during feasibility study?). If the job is accepted how is this characteristic/process identified at the point of manufacture? Who is responsible? If a problem arises with a safety critical process or product characteristic, what is the escalation plan? Who is responsible? If your organization accepts a job with safety critical characteristics or process, who reviews to see if there can be an impact by your external providers? Who is responsible for communicating these to your external providers.

If you are an existing automotive tier manufacturer, I would assume that there are existing controls within your process, to which these considerations can be added without creating something entirely new.

For example: An IF-THEN decision tree (i.e. IF the customer identifies a safety critical process and/or product characteristics) simply allow the decision tree to identify WHO does WHAT and WHEN. This could be applied to...
1- Initial feasibility study (should we take this job? If so, what are the risks?)
2- APQP process development
a) Identify internally what characteristics/processes apply
b) Communicate externally to any affected external providers (purchasing identifies? quality verifies? )
3- Nonconforming product control
a) point to a determined IF-THEN escalation diagram as part of the reaction process

These are simply provided as food for thought. But in my experience, it is hard to predict today what sales may commit to tomorrow.

Hope this helps.
Be well.

thank you!! this is very helpful for me. :bighug:
 
#7
Kind of what John said, but I would keep it as "generic" as possible. Kind of if the need arises, we'll figure it out then. These days safety related issues should be identified in the customers prints, so you'll have fair warning.
 

John C. Abnet

Teacher,Sensei,Kennari
#9
thank you!! this is very helpful for me. :bighug:
Also, @LexiH22 , remind your organization that since you do not do design, be careful to NOT internally determine/identify processes or characteristics as "safety critical". The onus is on your customer (the designer). If your organization arbitrarily identifies product characteristics and/or processes as "safety critical", then you open yourselves to liability concerns. FYI.
 
#10
4.4.1.2 b) is clearly saying that managing it is our responsibility.
Customer is "allowed" to overlook it and then drawing would remain "clean".
In our times potentially each product could be considered as safety related, so do not treat in old manner style, "thiis only brake disc and airbag supplier headache".
Example - BMW Canada recalls 10,000 vehicles over coolant leak, fire risk
Nope. The customer has to identify safety related issues. Suppliers don't have to guess.
 
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