IATF Definitions - Reworked product (8.7.1.4) vs Repaired product (8.7.1.5)

C

CMGSpain

A rework makes a product conform to a customer specification (drawing or engineering specification). When a product is repaired it recover its function.
 

AlexK

Registered
Apparently “rework” brings a NC product to conformance with all applicable requirements and “repair” brings a NC product to a conformity with intended use (and not to conformity with all requirements, including with requirements of process flow and control plan).
Thus, a product is returned to a former process step (even to complete a missed operation or testing): when that process flow loop is not defined in PFD / CP, then it constitutes a “repair” and requires approval of the Customer.
 

Jim Wynne

Leader
Admin
Apparently “rework” brings a NC product to conformance with all applicable requirements and “repair” brings a NC product to a conformity with intended use (and not to conformity with all requirements, including with requirements of process flow and control plan).
Thus, a product is returned to a former process step (even to complete a missed operation or testing): when that process flow loop is not defined in PFD / CP, then it constitutes a “repair” and requires approval of the Customer.
No. While it might be necessary to notify a customer that the approved process has not or will not be used in manufacture of the product, that doesn't mean that the product has been or will be "reworked." If the product is returned to a former process step due to nonconformity in the physical nature of the product, that's rework.
 

zezee

Registered
as a result of machining process diameter is 6,5cm instead of 6,7cm with rework you can remachine it and hit the specification that is rework. But if diameter is 7 cm instead of 6,7 cm and you think that by wellding and after that with remachining you can hit the specification, that is repair. With repiar process you can hit the specs but you caused additional changes in the part/material etc. but after rework there is no change in the part
 

AlexK

Registered
No. While it might be necessary to notify a customer that the approved process has not or will not be used in manufacture of the product, that doesn't mean that the product has been or will be "reworked." If the product is returned to a former process step due to nonconformity in the physical nature of the product, that's rework.
Per ISO 9000:2015:
"3.6.9 nonconformity = non fulfillment of a requirement."
"3.6.4 requirement = need or expectation that is stated, generally implied or obligatory."
"3.12.8 rework: action on a nonconforming (3.6.9) product (3.7.6) or service (3.7.7) to make it conform to the requirements (3.6.4)."
"3.12.9 repair: action on a nonconforming (3.6.9) product (3.7.6) or service (3.7.7) to make it acceptable for intended use.
Note 1 to entry: A successful repair of a nonconforming product or service does not necessarily make the product or service conform to requirements (3.6.4)."

The "requirements" apparently include those stated in PFC / CP material flow.
When such "rework loop" is not defined in PFC / CP: returning a product to a previous process step constitutes a "repair"; and (according to the definitions of ISO 9000:2015 and IATF 16949) requires approval of customer.
When such "rework loop" is defined in PFC / CP: returning of a product to such previous step constitutes a "rework" and approval of the customer will not be needed.
 

Sebastian

Trusted Information Resource
Alex you gave rework and repair definitions here.
Requirements stands for product specification presented in design records, e.g. product drawing.
PFC/CP presence or not, does not transform rework into repair.
It's about product itself.
 
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