Ideas to stop bad practices in daily work

Cari Spears

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Not being familiar with your type of product and production processes, I would still recommend that your efforts be directed to how you can prevent a production operator from producing parts/product that differs from the first piece approval.

Are they able to adjust the alignment of the machine? Are they replenishing stock themselves?

And yes, I would absolutely final inspect against the same specifications that your first piece was approved to. I would hang that first piece approval where the operator could see and reference it throughout that run, and I would compare the last piece to the first piece at final. I would determine, based on the history of the process, how often I would plan for in-process inspection - but it doesn't always have to be an inspector.
 
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John Predmore

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You have a challenging dilemma, to be sure. One idea is to foster a culture where no employee accepts work passed forward from another employee/workstation which is non-conforming. This policy makes every employee an inspector of the previous person's work. More inspection is usually not an economical solution, but it could be preferred to the alternative of letting mistakes slip by. I realize this could lead to interpersonal friction, so supervisors have to promote teamwork spirit and pride of workmanship.

My other idea is where you recognize in advance that one low-frequency print job is similar to [an]other more common setups, employ a way to highlight the differences in the low-frequency version -- use a highlighter pen, or print the traveler on different colored paper, or use those arrow-shaped post-it notes. If you use an electronic router, create an extra operation step in the sequence to verify parameter setup, or if necessary, make the verification step one completed by the supervisor or the quality department.
 

qualprod

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You have a challenging dilemma, to be sure. One idea is to foster a culture where no employee accepts work passed forward from another employee/workstation which is non-conforming. This policy makes every employee an inspector of the previous person's work. More inspection is usually not an economical solution, but it could be preferred to the alternative of letting mistakes slip by. I realize this could lead to interpersonal friction, so supervisors have to promote teamwork spirit and pride of workmanship.

My other idea is where you recognize in advance that one low-frequency print job is similar to [an]other more common setups, employ a way to highlight the differences in the low-frequency version -- use a highlighter pen, or print the traveler on different colored paper, or use those arrow-shaped post-it notes. If you use an electronic router, create an extra operation step in the sequence to verify parameter setup, or if necessary, make the verification step one completed by the supervisor or the quality department.
Thanks John
First paragraph is understood perfectly, not the second one.
Could you explain in detail this practice (second paragraph) please? I didn´t catch it.

Thanks
 

John Predmore

Trusted Information Resource
From your original message :
At doing the analysis of the post nonconformances, people said the same, "I thought it was the same product", "one week ago, I fabricated one very similar" "I forgot to read the small letter text in the bottom of the specification"

So the identified root cause was they didn't realize the product they were working on was different from the one they thought they were working on. This can happen, for example when human beings do the same work sequence 100 times in a row and then they receive an order which is "very similar". The countermeasure I offered was to highlight the differences, "the small letter text in the bottom" for example, so that a worker is less likely to "forget to read". The last time I bought a house, the mortgage application had me initial every page and a few paragraphs here and there. The agent highlighted every spot for me in advance, so I would not miss any. The 3 spots where I had to sign my legal signature instead of my initials, he used a colored post-it note instead of a yellow highlighter and partially covered the blank line, so I had to break the rote habit and remove the post-it before I could sign, as a way to call attention to the fact that these 3 spots were different from all the rest.

Another tactic is to highlight at a high level that this item here is different. The first example that comes to mind is a factory where I worked. When there was a model-changeover, from right-handed widgets to left-handed widgets let's say, the first piece of the new model comes down the assembly line with a big prominent yellow tag attached or a flagstick like you see on a golf course or the back of a kid's bicycle, as a visible reminder to all workers there is a change on this one. It would be hard for a worker to say they did not notice.
 
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